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Covered Bridge Adventures

The Covered Bridge stands out in modern times as distinct architecture which harkens back to an older period of highway travel.  Most cover bridges in North American were constructed during the 19th Century and largely featured entirely timber designs.  Over 14,000 Covered Bridges have been constructed in the United States alone, only a fraction which survive today.  This page explores the Covered Bridge structures featured in the Gribblenation blog series.  If you are intrigued by the era before the modernization of highways a Covered Bridge is always a great place to start.  Depicted as the page cover is the Barronvale Covered Bridge which can be found at Laurel Hill Creek of Middlecreek Township, Pennsylvania.  

 

Covered Bridges in the United States


California

Roberts Ferry Covered Bridge

Knight's Ferry Covered Bridge

Felton Covered Bridge

Wawona Covered Bridge

The last two covered bridges in the State Highway System (California State Route 96)

O’Byrne’s Ferry Covered Bridge

Bridgeport Covered Bridge

Honey Run Covered Bridge


Connecticut

Bulls Bridge

Comstock Covered Bridge


Georgia

Auchumpkee Creek Bridge


Indiana

Bridgeton Covered Bridge

Crooks Covered Bridge

Mansfield Covered Bridge


Nebraska

Great Platte River Road Archway


New Hampshire

Mount Orne Covered Bridge

Cilleyville Covered Bridge

Slate Covered Bridge

Prentiss Covered Bridge

Columbia Covered Bridge

Meriden Covered Bridge

Squam River Covered Bridge

Bath-Haverhill Covered Bridge

Thompson Covered Bridge

Pier Covered Bridge

Groveton Covered Bridge

Mechanic Street Covered Bridge

Bath Covered Bridge

Albany Covered Bridge

Corbin Covered Bridge

Saco River Covered Bridge

Pittsburg-Clarksville Covered Bridge (Bacon Bridge)

Blair Covered Bridge

Ashuelot Covered Bridge

Cooms Covered Bridge


New York

Mill Brook Covered Bridge

Jay Covered Bridge

Hyde Hall Covered Bridge

Perrine's Covered Bridge

Newfield Covered Bridge

Salisbury Covered Bridge

Fox Creek Covered Bridge

Rexleigh Covered Bridge

Blenheim Covered Bridge

Eagleville Covered Bridge

Buskirk Bridge

Newfield Covered Bridge


North Carolina

Pocket Creek Covered Bridge

Pisgah Covered Bridge


Maine

Sunday River Covered Bridge

Hemlock Covered Bridge

Porter-Parsonfield Covered Bridge

Lovejoy Covered Bridge

Low's Covered Bridge

Babb's Covered Bridge

Bennett Covered Bridge

Robyville Covered Bridge


Maryland

Jericho Covered Bridge

Utica Mills Covered Bridge

Foxcatcher Farms Covered Bridge

Gilpin's Falls Covered Bridge

Roddy Road Covered Bridge

Loys Station Covered Bridges


Massachusetts 

Arthur A. Smith Covered Bridge

Old Pepperell (Chester Waterous) Covered Bridge

Bissell Covered Bridge

Upper Sheffield Covered Bridge


Michigan

Fallasburg Covered Bridge

Whites Covered Bridge


Ohio

Hueston Woods Covered Bridge

Harpersfield Covered Bridge

Newton Falls Covered Bridge

Mohican State Park Covered Bridge

Everett Covered Bridge

Mechanicsville Covered Bridge

Netcher Road Covered Bridge

Olin Covered Bridge

Caine Road Covered Bridge

West Liberty Street Covered Bridge - Geneva, Ohio


Oregon

Wildcat Creek Covered Bridge

Grave Creek Covered Bridge

Pengra Covered Bridge

Lowell Covered Bridge

Earnest Covered Bridge

Harris Covered Bridge

Ritner Creek Covered Bridge

Short Covered Bridge

Gallon House Bridge

Chitwood Covered Bridge

Stayton Jordan Covered Bridge

Deadwood Covered Bridge

Shimanek Covered Bridge

Hayden Covered Bridge

Coyote Creek Covered Bridge

Gilkey Covered Bridge

Goodpasture Covered Bridge


Pennsylvania

Hassenplug Covered Bridge

Keefers Mill Covered Bridge

Wertz's Red Covered Bridge

Herline Covered Bridge

Kidd's Mill Covered Bridge

Sam Wagner Covered Bridge

Colemanville Covered Bridge

Millmont Covered Bridge

Bucher's Mill Covered Bridge

Hall's Mill Covered Bridge

Baumgardner Mill Covered Bridge

Ryot Covered Bridge

Buttonwood Covered Bridge

Josiah Hess Covered Bridge

Stillwater Covered Bridge

Banks Covered Bridge

Logan Mills Covered Bridge

McGees Mills Covered Bridge

Slippery Rock Creek Covered Bridge

Cox Farms Covered Bridge

Barronvale Covered Bridge


Vermont

Mount Orne Covered Bridge

Chiselville Covered Bridge

Sanderson Covered Bridge

Maple Street Covered Bridge

Gold Brook Covered Bridge

East Shoreham Covered Railroad Bridge

Middle Covered Bridge

Halpin Covered Bridge

Downers Covered Bridge (Upper Falls Covered Bridge)

Power House Covered Bridge

Columbia Covered Bridge

Poland Covered Bridge (Cambridge Junction Covered Bridge)

Paper Mill Bridge

Taftsville Covered Bridge

Mill and Cilley Covered Bridges

Quechee Covered Bridge

West Dummerston Covered Bridge

Arlington Green Covered Bridge

Randall Bridge

Holmes Creek Covered Bridge


Virginia

Humpback Covered Bridge

Meems Bottom Covered Bridge

Patrick County Covered Bridges


Washington

Grays River Covered Bridge


West Virginia

Philippi Covered Bridge


Wisconsin

Smith Rapids Covered Bridge


Covered Bridges in Canada


New Brunswick 

Tynemouth Covered Bridge

Plumweseep Covered Bridge

Florenceville Bridge

Smithtown Covered Bridge

Hoyt Station Covered Bridge

Hartland Covered Bridge

Bayswater Covered Bridge

Urney Covered Bridge

Moores Mills Covered Bridge

Salmon Covered Bridge

Tranton Covered Bridge

MacFarlane Covered Bridge

Hasty Covered Bridge

Sawmill Creek Covered Bridge

Hardscrabble Covered Bridge


Quebec

Prud'homme Covered Bridge

Wakefield Covered Bridge

Powerscourt Covered Bridge

Milby Covered Bridge

Drouin Covered Bridge

Eustis Covered Bridge

Freeport Covered Bridge

Comments

Unknown said…
What about Parke County, Indiana?
Doug said…
The links are for the covered bridge pages we have published so far. I actually have photos of some of the Parke County covered bridges (plus Ashtabula County in Ohio, Madison County in Iowa and much more), which will be added at a later date.

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