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Middle Covered Bridge - Woodstock, Vermont

 


The Middle Covered Bridge spans over the Ottaquechee River as the centerpiece bridge of Woodstock, Vermont, just a stone's throw away from the downtown business district. Built in 1969 by Milton S. Graton and his sons (now Arnold M. Graton Associates), the 181 foot long covered bridge was designed in a Town lattice through truss design and replaced an iron truss bridge called the Middle Bridge that had been rendered obsolete.

The Middle Covered Bridge is the first public covered bridge built in the State of Vermont since 1889. Builder Milton Graton constructed this masterpiece near the crossing, then in July 1969, it was pulled across the river by a team of oxen named Ben and Jo. The covered bridge was built using traditional methods and materials down to the wooden pegs in lieu of nails. Details of the construction of the Middle Covered Bridge can also be found in a book written entitled The Last of the Covered Bridge Builders by covered bridge builder Milton Graton.

The covered bridge was burned by arsonists on May 11, 1974. Fortunately, Milton Graton came to the rescue and was able to restore the covered bridge. Today, the bridge can be enjoyed by drivers and pedestrians alike, especially with its separate portals for pedestrian traffic. Visitors to the bridge will notice that while most of the bridge has a stained wood look, the north entrance to the bridge has been painted a white or light gray color. The covered bridge has a nice view in the background of Mount Tom, which was once a ski area. When I visited the Middle Covered Bridge during a snowy New England day, I definitely got the classic vibes of the Vermont of yore. I think it blends perfectly with its surroundings.

South entrance of the Middle Covered Bridge.

An icy, snowy Ottaquechee River, apparently with ice thick enough to run tracks along the river.

Bridge plaque.

Inside the covered bridge. The open Town lattice design allows the light to come into the bridge.

A parting shot of the Middle Covered Bridge.


How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
The Travels of Tug 44 - Middle Covered Bridge
Bridgehunter.com - Middle Covered Bridge 45-14-15
Vermont Covered Bridge Society - Middle Covered Bridge
Woodstock, Vermont - 4 covered bridges that epitomize Vermont charm: A visual tour

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