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Paper Highways: Unbuilt California State Route 228

California State Route 228 was a planned highway which was defined during the 1964 State Highway Renumbering as a bypass of Brawley.  California State Route 228 was planned as a two-mile north/south State Highway which would have followed Malan Canal and Sandal Cancel west of Brawley.  California State Route 228 was deleted in 1998 with no actual mileage ever having been constructed.  Above California State Route 228 can be seen on the 1964 Division of Highways Map with a determined adopted routing. The history of planned California State Route 228 Prior to the 1964 State Highway Renumbering the city of Brawley was served by US Route 99 which overlayed on Legislative Route Number 26 (LRN 26).  US Route 99 southbound followed LRN 26 over the New River and entered Brawley via Main Street.  From Main Street the alignment of US Route 99/LRN 26 followed 1st Street and Brawley Avenue southward towards El Centro.  By the 1960s the jog in US Route 99/LRN 26 into downtown Brawley brought signif
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Paper Highways: Proposed US Route 66 Alternate to Las Vegas, Nevada

During February 1956 the State of Nevada in concurrence with the States of California and Arizona submitted a request to the American Association of State Highway Officials to establish US Route 66 Alternate to Las Vegas.  The proposed US Route 66 Alternate would have originated from mainline US Route 66 in Kingman Arizona and followed a multiplex of US Routes 93-466 to Las Vegas, Nevada.  From Las Vegas, Nevada the proposed US Route 66 Alternate would have multiplexed US Routes 91-466 back to mainline US Route 66 in Barstow, California.  The request to establish US Route 66 Alternate was denied during June 1956 due to it being completely multiplexed with other US Routes.  This blog will examine the timeline of the US Route 66 Alternate proposal to Las Vegas, Nevada. The history of the proposed US Route 66 Alternate to Las Vegas, Nevada On February 15, 1956, the Nevada State Highway Engineer in a letter to the American Association of State Highways Officials (AASHO) advising that six c

Oldtown Toll Bridge - Maryland and West Virginia

  The Oldtown Toll Bridge linking Oldtown, Maryland over the Potomac River with neighboring Green Spring, West Virginia is only one of a few truly privately owned toll bridges located in the United States. It's a simple bridge by design, as the 318 foot long Oldtown Toll Bridge is a low water bridge. Low water bridges are designed to allow water to safely and efficiently flow over the bridge deck. Additionally, a dozen concrete pedestals have been secured in the Potomac River in order to support the bridge and wooden deck. The bridge was constructed in 1937 when a gentleman by the name of Mr. Carpenter obtained the proper permits to build the Bridge through an Act of Congress. This was a blessing for residents, especially on the West Virginia side of the Potomac River, as it saved motorists commuting to Cumberland an hour in travel time. Using Mr. Carpenter's blueprints, the Army Corp of Engineers and a number of local laborers constructed the bridge and it remained under the

Carnesville, Georgia

Carnesville is a small town of just over 700 residents in Northeast Georgia.  Founded in 1805 as the county seat for Franklin County, Carnesville was incorporated as a town in 1819.   Carnesville is named after Judge Thomas P. Carnes - a lawyer and later congressman.  Former in 1784, Franklin County is named after Ben Franklin and was Georgia's ninth county. Franklin County Courthouse. The center of this small city is the Franklin County Courthouse.  The neoclassical design structure has been standing since 1906 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.  The courthouse is one of 12 locations listed within the register in the Carnesville Area. Downtown Carnesville might be small but it is still charming. Carnesville is home to the Franklin County Livestock Market - which is the largest in the state. All photos taken by post author - June 23, 2021 . Sources & Links: Explore Georgia - Carnesville Franklin County Communities - Carnesville How To Get There:

Hidden California State Route 710 and the Pasadena Gap in the Long Beach Freeway

Infamous and the subject of much controversy the Pasadena Gap in the Long Beach Freeway has long existed as a contentious topic regarding the completion of Interstate 710 and California State Route 710.  While the Pasadena Gap of the Long Beach Freeway effectively has been legislatively blocked the action only came after decades of controversy.  While the Pasadena Gap of the Long Beach Freeway is fairly well known what many don't know is that a small segment was actually constructed south Interstate 210 and the Foothill Freeway.  This disconnected segment of the Long Beach Freeway exists as the unsigned and largely hidden California State Route 710.  On June 29, 2022 the California Transportation Commission relinquished California State Route 710 to the city of Pasadena.  The blog cover above depicts a southward view on the completed Pasadena stub segment of the Long Beach Freeway which ends at California Boulevard.   Part 1; the history of the Pasadena Gap of the Long Beach Freewa