Skip to main content

Pengra Covered Bridge - Oregon

 


Also known as the Fall Creek Covered Bridge, the Pengra Covered Bridge is a 268 foot long covered Howe through truss designed covered bridge spanning over the Fall Creek in Lane County, Oregon, southeast of Eugene and Springfield. Built in 1938, the bridge was built by A.C. Striker, who was the Lane County bridge superintendent at the time. The Pengra Covered Bridge contains two of the longest timbers ever cut for a bridge in Oregon, covered or not. The timbers for the lower chords, 16 inch by 18 inch by 126 feet long. Since 18 inch timbers were too large to be run through a sawmill, they were rough hewn in the woods, transported to the bridge site by truck and resurfaced before being set into place. The dimensions of the upper chord are of similar proportions at 14 inch by 18 inch by 96 feet long. While the use of one piece chords simplified construction techniques in building the bridge and resulted in a stronger truss, the handling such large timbers often proved to be difficult. Another distinctive feature of the bridge is a small roofed window on the southwest facing side, allowing drivers to see oncoming traffic as it approaches the bridge.

The Pengra Covered Bridge replaced a 192 foot span that was built in 1904 and was only a few feet upstream from the current bridge. The effect of weather and increased traffic caused Lane County to close the bridge in 1979. While Lane County officials had planned to reopen the structure, getting a contract ready for work for bridge restoration was delayed for several years. The bridge was repaired and reopened to traffic by Lane County in 1995 with the help of a grant from the Oregon Covered Bridge Program.

Regarding the name, Pengra was a station on the Cascade Line of the Southern Pacific Railroad and was named for B.J. Pengra, a pioneer in the history of early Oregon who later became general surveyor of Oregon in 1862. Pengra had surveyed the route of the Oregon Central Military Road to link the Willamette Valley with the Owyhee mining country of Eastern Oregon. The road was finished to the summit of the Cascades in 1867, but was seldom used, perhaps due to other roads that were built at the time (the Santiam Wagon Road along what is modern day US 20 comes to mind). The Pengra Unity Road lies on the old railroad grade of the old Cascade Line and has been renamed Place Road, but the bridge retains the name.







How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
Eugene Cascades and Coast - Pengra Covered Bridge
Oregon.com - Fall Creek (Pengra) Covered Bridge
Bridgehunter.org - Pengra Covered Bridge 37-20-15
Covered-Bridges.org - The Pengra (Fall Creek) Bridge
Library of Congress - Pengra Bridge, Spanning Fall Creek, Place Road (CR 480), Jasper, Lane County, OR

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Deer Isle Bridge in Maine

As graceful a bridge that I ever set my eyes upon, the Deer Isle Bridge (officially known as the Deer Isle-Sedgwick Bridge) surprisingly caught my eye as I was driving around coastal Maine one Saturday afternoon. About 35 miles south of Bangor, Maine , the Deer Isle Bridge connects the Blue Hill Peninsula of Downeast Maine with Little Deer Isle over the Eggemoggin Reach on ME 15 between the towns of Sedgwick and Deer Isle . It should be noted that Little Deer Isle is connected to Deer Isle by way of a boulder lined causeway, and there is a storied regatta that takes place on the Eggemoggin Reach each summer. But the Deer Isle Bridge holds many stories, not just for the vacationers who spend part of their summer on Deer Isle or in nearby Stonington , but for the residents throughout the years and the folks who have had a hand bringing this vital link to life.   The Deer Isle Bridge was designed by David Steinman and built by the Phoenix Bridge Company of Phoenixville,

Former US Route 99 through Athlone and the last Wheeler Ridge-Sacramento corridor expressway

Athlone was a siding of the Southern Pacific Railroad located in Merced County on the alignment of what was US Route 99 between the cities of Chowchilla and Merced.  The Athlone corridor of US Route 99 was one of the first in San Joaquin Valley to fully upgraded to four lane expressway standards.  The Athlone expressway corridor was inherited by California State Route 99 when US Route 99 was truncated to Ashland, Oregon during June 1965.  The four-lane expressway through Athlone was the last segment of what had been US Route 99 in the Wheeler Ridge-Sacramento corridor to be bypassed by a freeway.  The Athlone expressway corridor was bypassed by the modern California State Route 99 freeway in 2016.  Despite being put on a road diet and narrowed what was the Athlone expressway corridor still displays evidence of being part of US Route 99.   Above the blog cover photo displays the Athlone expressway corridor of US Route 99 south of Merced as depicted in the July 1939 California Highways &

Breezewood - The Rise and Decline of a Highway Rest Stop

It's the Pennsylvania Turnpike Interchange most people hate - and with a passion.  The Breezewood Interchange - a junction of two Interstates (70 & 76) that became complicated due to archaic rules, rural politics and power, and an unwillingness to change.  At its romanticized best, this small unincorporated community of under 100 residents is a reminder of travel days of the 1950s-1970s; at its worst, it is a gradually dying relic of old motels and services that drivers are forced to slow down and drive through on their way to bigger and more modern destinations. The Breezewood Strip - where Interstate 70 runs along a surface street (US 30) (Doug Kerr) The Breezewood Interchange is an exception to the rule in the Interstate Highway System.  Depending on your direction, Interstate 70 joins or leaves the Pennsylvania Turnpike (Interstate 76) here.  However, unlike nearly every Interstate junction in the United States - Interstate 70 must traverse on a roughly 1/4 mile stretch of