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Showing posts from August, 2019

Gribblenation is on Instagram!

We have some quick and exciting news to share with everyone. Gribblenation now has an Instagram account, which can be found at https://www.instagram.com/gribblenation/. You can also find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/gribblenation/, on Twitter at https://twitter.com/gribblenation/ and of course, on this trusty blog page at http://www.gribblenation.org/.

As for the photo, it's just a really neat photo of the Iceland's Ring Road near the Hvalfjörður Tunnel that I took a few years ago.

National Park Wednesday; Channel Islands National Park and East Anacapa Island

This past month I visited Channel Islands National Park for the third time.  The destination on this particular trip was East Anacapa Island.


Channel Islands National Park is located in California and consists of five of eight of the Channel Islands of Santa Barbara Channel.   Channel Islands National Part currently consists of nearly 250,000 acres of land and water.  Protection of the Channel Islands began in April of 1938 when Anacapa Island and Santa Barbra Island were added to Channel Islands National Monument.   Channel Islands National Monument was declared in March of 1980.  The new Channel Islands National Park added Santa Rosa Island, San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island to the previous protected lands of Anacapa Island and Santa Barbra Island.

My journey to East Anacapa Island began from Channel Islands Harbor in Oxnard.  From Channel Islands Harbor there is about a dozen miles of open water in Santa Barbara Channel to East Anacapa Island.  Exiting Channel Island Harbor p…

Travel New England - Paper Mill Village Covered Bridge

Located Northwest of Downtown Bennington, Vermont, the Paper Mill Village Covered Bridge is one of five covered bridges in Bennington County.  The 125 foot long town lattice style bridge, built in 1889, crosses the Walloomsac River.


The bridge, which is also known as the Bennington Falls Covered Bridge, was built by Charles Sears. The covered bridge had some recent controversy when a Vermont historian lobbied to have the bridge removed from the National Register of Historic Places.  The bridge was initially added to the register in 1973.  A rehabilitation of the bridge occurred in 1999 and 2000.  In 2016, Devin Colman of the Vermont Division of Historic Preservation argued that the bridge was replaced with a replica and that it no longer met the standards of being listed in the register. (1)


Not long after, it was determined that although many of the original materials of the bridge was replaced that the bridge still met more than enough criteria to keep the designation.   Key points …