Skip to main content

Harris Covered Bridge - Benton County, Oregon

 


The Harris Covered Bridge located on Harris Road near Wren, Oregon was built by H.W. Fiedler to replace a covered bridge at the same site. The bridge was constructed in a Howe through truss design and is 137 feet in length as it spans across the Marys River. Although records in Benton County, Oregon records show 1936 as the construction date of the bridge, locals claim the span was built in 1929 and have posted the year on a sign on the bridge.

The Harris Covered Bridge retains a rounded portal design and other features, including narrow windows below the roof line to light the bridge's interior and longitudinal deck planks. The bridge's siding has been constructed with a board and batten style, along with a shingled roof. The covered bridge remains open for both light vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

Harris has been a community since 1890, bearing the name of a pioneer landowner by the name of George Harris. Before the community came along, there was a house and sawmill built by a gentleman by the name of Charles King. When the post office in town was established in 1918, residents petitioned for the name of Harris, but postal authorities feared confusion might develop with nearby Harrisburg. For a time, the town was known as Elam, named for Mrs. Gladys Elam, but the name of the community was later changed to Harris. The post office lasted until December 31, 1928 when it was closed and services moved to Wren.

Not much is left from the heyday of Harris, Oregon, just a few homes and a winery. The former town site of Harris is marked by the Harris Bridge Winery and the Harris Covered Bridge. The Harris Bridge Winery is located within view of the covered bridge, offering wine tasting, picnicking, a couple of annual music festivals and stories that have been penned by their resident writer.

To get to the Harris Covered Bridge, you can take US 20 west about four miles from Philomath to the intersection with OR 223 in Wren. Take the right onto OR 223 to Wren (Kings Valley Highway), then immediately take the next right to Wren Road. Take the next right, which is just before the train tracks on to Harris Road. From there, take Harris Road for about two and a half miles west of the community of Wren and you will encounter the Harris Covered Bridge. Happy traveling!


How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
Covered-Bridges.org - Harris Bridge
Travel Oregon - Harris Covered Bridge
Visit Corvallis - Harris Covered Bridge
Bridgehunter.com - Harris Covered Bridge 37-02-04
Pacific Northwest Photoblog - Harris, Oregon – Ghost Town, Covered Bridge, Winery (Elam)
Tabby Cat's Pawprints - Armchair photo tours: The Harris Covered Bridge near Philomath, Oregon

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Paper Highways: The Unbuilt New Orleans Bypass (Proposed I-410)

  There are many examples around the United States of proposed freeway corridors in urban areas that never saw the light of day for one reason or another. They all fall somewhere in between the little-known and the infamous and from the mundane to the spectacular. One of the more obscure and interesting examples of such a project is the short-lived idea to construct a southern beltway for the New Orleans metropolitan area in the 1960s and 70s. Greater New Orleans and its surrounding area grew rapidly in the years after World War II, as suburban sprawl encroached on the historically rural downriver parishes around the city. In response to the development of the region’s Westbank and the emergence of communities in St. Charles and St. John the Baptist Parishes as viable suburban communities during this period, regional planners began to consider concepts for new infrastructure projects to serve this growing population.  The idea for a circular freeway around the southern perimeter of t

Hernando de Soto Bridge (Memphis, TN)

The newest of the bridges that span the lower Mississippi River at Memphis, the Hernando de Soto Bridge was completed in 1973 and carries Interstate 40 between downtown Memphis and West Memphis, AR. The bridge’s signature M-shaped superstructure makes it an instantly recognizable landmark in the city and one of the most visually unique bridges on the Mississippi River. As early as 1953, Memphis city planners recommended the construction of a second highway bridge across the Mississippi River to connect the city with West Memphis, AR. The Memphis & Arkansas Bridge had been completed only four years earlier a couple miles downriver from downtown, however it was expected that long-term growth in the metro area would warrant the construction of an additional bridge, the fourth crossing of the Mississippi River to be built at Memphis, in the not-too-distant future. Unlike the previous three Mississippi River bridges to be built the city, the location chosen for this bridge was about two

Memphis & Arkansas Bridge (Memphis, TN)

  Like the expansion of the railroads the previous century, the modernization of the country’s highway infrastructure in the early and mid 20th Century required the construction of new landmark bridges along the lower Mississippi River (and nation-wide for that matter) that would facilitate the expected growth in overall traffic demand in ensuing decades. While this new movement had been anticipated to some extent in the Memphis area with the design of the Harahan Bridge, neither it nor its neighbor the older Frisco Bridge were capable of accommodating the sharp rise in the popularity and demand of the automobile as a mode of cross-river transportation during the Great Depression. As was the case 30 years prior, the solution in the 1940s was to construct a new bridge in the same general location as its predecessors, only this time the bridge would be the first built exclusively for vehicle traffic. This bridge, the Memphis & Arkansas Bridge, was completed in 1949 and was the third