Skip to main content

US Route 99


Welcome to the Gribblenation US Route 99 Page, your destination to find all things US Route 99.  US Route 99 was one of the original US Routes created in 1926 alongside the US Route System.  At its peak US Route 99 was approximately 1,600 miles spanning from Mexican Broder in Calexico, California north to the Canadian Border at Blaine, Washington.  US Route 99 has a legacy which is approached by few other American highways which has developed a strong following in the road community.  This page is meant to serve as compellation of all Gribblenation blogs and media pertaining to the US Route 99 family of highways.  

The page cover image seen above was taken from the Columbia Street onramp to former US Route 99 on the Alaskan Way Viaduct by Tom Fearer on May 10th, 2018.  Below the general corridor of US Route 99 as it was during its peak can be seen.  





A general timeline of the birth and death of US Route 99

The US Route System was finalized on November 11th, 1926 by the Executive Committee of the American Association of State Highway Officials ("AASHO").  US Route 99 was one of the original US Routes created by the AASHO Executive Committee.  As originally plotted US Route 99 began at US Route 80 in El Centro, California and terminated at the Canadian Border in Blaine, Washington.  The original southern terminus of US Route 99 in El Centro can be seen in the AASHO US Route descriptions for California dated November 11th, 1926.  



As originally conceived US Route 99 only had one three digit child route in the form of US Route 199.  US Route 199 was plotted via the Redwood Highway from Crescent City, California to Grants Pass, Oregon.  


On September 8th, 1931 the California Division of Highways proposed an extension of US Route 99 from US Route 80 in El Centro south to the Mexican Border at Calexico.  





The AASHO Executive Committee on June 22nd, 1932 notified the California Division of Highways that US Route 99 was approved to be extended to the Mexican Border.


On August 11th, 1934 the California State Highway Engineer petitioned the AASHO for a new US Route designation between Arcata and Alturas via the corridor of California State Route 44.  




The first route descriptions of US Route 299 and US Route 399 can be observed in a September 1934 letter by the California State Highway Engineer to the AASHO.  US Route 299 and US Route 399 along with numerous other US Route designations in California were approved by the AASHO Executive Committee Meeting during November of 1934.  US Route 299 retained the definition requested by the California Division of Highways for the Arcata-Alturas corridor.  US Route 399 is described as having a proposed length of 131 miles beginning from a south terminus at US 101 in Ventura along with a north terminus at US Route 99 in Bakersfield.


The elimination of US Route 299 was approved by the AASHO Executive Committee on June 19th, 1963 and would become effective on New Year's Day 1964.  The elimination of US Route 299 was requested by the State of California due to the highway not meeting the 1959 AASHO 300 mile intra-state standard for a single State US Routes.  The State of California intended to replace the entire 295 miles of US Route 299 with California State Route 299.  



On May 1st, 1963 the Division of Highways submitted a request to the AASHO Executive Committee to remove US Route 399 as part of the planned 1964 California State Highway Renumbering.   This request was considered by the AASHO Executive Committee on June 19th, 1963 and met with their approval.  US Route 399 subsequently would effectively cease to exist come New Year 1964.  US Route 399 was replaced by California State Route 119 from Bakersfield to Taft and saw California State Route 33 realigned from Maricopa via the Ventura-Maricopa Highway to Ventura.  





The truncation of US Route 99 from Calexico to the junction of the Golden State Freeway and San Bernardino Freeway in Los Angeles was approved by the AASHO Executive Committee on June 19th, 1963.  The justification by the California Division of Highways to truncate US Route 99 was to avoid what the agency viewed as confusing multiplexes on the new Interstate corridors of Southern California.  




The AASHO Renumbering database shows that US 99 was approved to be truncated out of California to Ashland, Oregon by the AASHO Executive Committee on June 29th, 1965.  This measure would have become effective on New Years Day 1966.  









On June 24th, 1969 the AASHO Executive Commitee approved a request by the Washington State Highway Commission to eliminate US Route 99 in Washington.  The Washington State Highway Commission approved a motion to eliminate US Route 99 on April 22nd, 1969.  The justification to eliminate US Route 99 in Washington State was to avoid confusion and cost associated with signing the highway concurrent on much of Interstate 5.  




On July 27th, 1971 the Oregon State Highway Division informed the AASHO Executive Director that the State Highway Commission had approved the elimination of US Route 99 from the State in favor of like numbered State Routes.


The elimination of US Route 99 from Oregon was approved by the AASHO Executive Committee on December 4th, 1971.  The deletion of US Route 99 in Oregon left only US Route 199 as the remaining part of the US Route 99 family left in the US Route System .





Version History of the Gribblenation US Route 99 Page

Version 1; page launched as of December, 13th 2021.  This page will be updated as blogs and media pertaining to US Route 99 are created.  Additional features may be added as this page progresses. 



Gribblenation blogs pertaining to US Route 99

The below directory is list of Gribblenation blogs pertaining to US Route 99.  This section will be updated from the most southerly location we have on file in California ascending northward towards the Canadian Border in Washington State.  Our blogs are heavily oriented towards exploring in detail the history of alignments of US Route 99 in particular regions and cities. 

US Route 99 in California



















































Oregon



Washington





Child Routes of US Route 99








Gribblenation Roadcast media 

The below directory is list of Gribblenation Roadcasts pertaining to US Route 99.  This segment will sporadically expand as topics of interest develop into Roadcasts. 




Comments

Unknown said…
Very interesting, I take both 99 E & W frequently from Portland South. There are a couple of spots near Jefferson Or that I am sure are part of 99E. I have also taken 99 south from Eugene until it runs into I 5. I am quite familiar with 99 after that.
I also know 199 very well. I was on 299 a few years ago at night. Never again at night.

Popular posts from this blog

Yes, the color of your nearby fire hydrant matters...

...and here's why. You will find White, Red, Yellow and Violet colored fire hydrants pretty much everywhere.  But there's a reason for this - and it's because of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  This association has issued guidelines for color coding standards for fire hydrants.  These color codes from the body of the hydrant, top of the hydrant, and in some municipalities the outlet caps are designed to allow fire fighters to know what type of system, water flow rate (Gallons Per Minute or GPM), and level of water pressure.  This guideline is known as NFPA 291 and is intended to be used universally throughout the United States. The NFPA guidelines are specific to the body and the top cap of the hydrant.  If a hydrant is WHITE or YELLOW - it means that it is connected to a public/municipal water system.  If a hydrant is RED - the hydrant is connected to a private system, typically a well.  These are most common in rural or unincorporated areas

Phase 1 of the California State Route 132 West Expressway (in the making since 1947)

On September 15, 2022, the Phase 1 of the California State Route 132 West Expressway opened in the city of Modesto from California State Route 99 west to North Dakota Avenue.  Phase 1 of the California State Route 132 West Expressway was built upon a corridor which was tentatively to designated to become the branching point for Interstate 5W in the 1947 concept of the Interstate Highway System.  The present California State Route 132 West Expressway corridor was adopted by the California Highway Commission on June 20, 1956.  Despite almost being rescinded during the 1970s the concept of the California State Route 132 West Expressway corridor lingered on for over half a century and became likely the oldest undeveloped right-of-way owned by California Transportation Commission.  Pictured above is the planned California State Route 132 freeway west of US Route 99 in Modesto as featured in the May/June 1962 California Highways & Public Works.   The history of the California State Route

Aptos Creek Road to the Loma Prieta ghost town site

Aptos Creek Road is a roadway in Santa Cruz County, California which connects the community of Aptos north to The Forest of Nisene Marks State Parks.  Aptos Creek Road north of Aptos is largely unpaved and is where the town site of Loma Prieta can be located.  Loma Prieta was a sawmill community which operated from 1883-1923 and reached a peak population of approximately three hundred.  Loma Prieta included a railroad which is now occupied by Aptos Creek Road along with a spur to Bridge Creek which now the Loma Prieta Grade Trail.  The site of the Loma Prieta Mill and company town burned in 1942.   Part 1; the history of Aptos Creek Road and the Loma Prieta town site Modern Aptos traces its origin to Mexican Rancho Aptos.  Rancho Aptos was granted by the Mexican Government in 1833 Rafael Castro.  Rancho Aptos took its name from Aptos Creek which coursed through from the Santa Cruz Mountains to Monterey Bay.  Castro initially used Rancho Aptos to raise cattle for their hides.  Following