Skip to main content

Albany Covered Bridge - New Hampshire

 


Located roughly six miles west of Conway along Swift River in the White Mountains of New Hampshire and near the very scenic Kancamagus Highway (NH 112), the Albany Covered Bridge is a popular stop for travelers taking the scenic route. The Albany Covered Bridge is a 120 foot long Paddleford truss covered bridge that was initially built in 1858, but was destroyed by a storm a year later which flooded the Swift River and swept away the new bridge. At that time, builders Almzi Russell and Leandre Morton entered into an agreement with the town of Albany to build a new covered bridge for $1,300, minus the amount previously paid for the original bridge. As a result of the agreement, the covered bridge was quickly rebuilt and has stood the test of time, along with a renovation in 1970. The artfully crafted covered bridge features wide shallow arches and sharply raked facades. In 1981 and 1982, the U.S. Forest Service replaced the wooden floor timbers with a steel floor for added support. Near the covered bridge is a mud sill, which was taken from the bed of the river to support the falsework and scaffolding during the construction of the bridge span.

Today, you can visit the Albany Covered Bridge off of Passaconaway Road if you are heading along NH 112. Some people may see the bridge on the way to the Covered Bridge Campground, other people may be traveling to the bridge to go fishing or get some neat photos of the Swift River and the covered bridge, while others (like myself the day I visited) may be stopping to see the bridge on the way to a further away destination. I visited during the early summer, but I'm told that the Albany Covered Bridge is picturesque in all seasons. If you are visiting the bridge, please be aware that there is a 7' 9" height restriction for vehicles using the bridge and that the bridge is closed to vehicles in the winter (but foot traffic is OK). There are some interpretive storyboards that can be seen around the bridge as well that will help tell the story of the bridge's construction. I was compelled to stop by and see the Albany Covered Bridge during a trip to New Hampshire and Maine in June 2013, and it was worth the stop.

View of the Swift River as seen from the Albany Covered Bridge.

And here's a couple views of the Albany Covered Bridge from the Swift River.


Side angle views of the Albany Covered Bridge.


The Swift River. This view must be an absolute gem during fall foliage season.

Approaching the Albany Covered Bridge.

The Swift River is a New Hampshire Protected River. The New Hampshire Protected Rivers are a part of the New Hampshire Rivers Management and Protection Program, which is designed to protect significant river resources through a combination of state and local resource management and protection.

A timber barrier has been set up to discourage drivers of oversized vehicles from driving across the Albany Covered Bridge




How to Get There:




Sources and Links:
NHTourGuide.com - Albany Covered Bridge (Kancamagus Highway Region)
USDA / White Mountain National Forest - Albany Covered Bridge
New Hampshire Covered Bridges - Albany Bridge
Bridgehunter.com - Albany Covered Bridge 29-02-06
Scenic USA - Albany Covered Bridge
KancamagusHighway.com - White Mountain National Forest Bridge (Aka Albany Covered Bridge)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Dummy Lights of New York

  A relic of the early days of motoring, dummy lights were traffic lights  that  were  placed  in the middle of a street intersection. In those early days, traffic shuffled through busy intersections with the help of a police officer who stood on top of a pedestal. As technology improved and electric traffic signals became commonplace, they were also  originally  positioned on a platform at the center of the intersection. Those traffic signals became known as  " dummy lights "  and were common until  traffic lights were moved  onto wires and poles that crossed above the intersection.  In New York State, only a handful of these dummy lights exist. The dummy lights  are found  in the Hudson Valley towns of Beacon and Croton-on-Hudson, plus there is an ongoing tug of war in Canajoharie in the Mohawk Valley, where their dummy light has been knocked down and replaced a few times. The dummy light in Canajoharie is currently out of commission, but popular demand has caused the dummy

Colorado Road (Fresno County)

Colorado Road is a rural highway located in San Joaquin Valley of western Fresno County.  Colorado Road services the city of San Joaquin in addition the unincorporated communities of Helm and Tranquility.  Colorado Road was constructed between 1910 and 1912 as a frontage road of the Hanford & Summit Lake Railway.  The roadway begins at California State Route 145 near Helm and terminates to the west at James Road in Tranquility.   Part 1; the history of Colorado Road Colorado Road was constructed as frontage road connecting the sidings of the Hanford & Summit Lake Railway.  The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway spanned from South Pacific Railroad West Side Line at Ingle junction southeast to the Coalinga Branch at Armona.  The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway broke ground during August 1910 and was complete by April 1912. The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway established numerous new sidings.  From Ingle the sidings of the line were Tranquility, Graham, San Joaquin, Caldwell, H

Francis Scott Key Bridge (1977-2024) (Baltimore, MD)

The Francis Scott Key Bridge (1977-2024) was a steel continuous truss bridge that spanned the Patapsco River in Baltimore, MD. Situated at the entrance to Baltimore’s Outer Harbor, the bridge carried Interstate 695 (part of the Baltimore Beltway) and was a visible symbol of the city and the state of Maryland. This bridge no longer exists due to its collapse as the result of a collision with a large container ship on March 26, 2024. The following piece will discuss the history and life of the Key Bridge, the important details surrounding the incident that caused its collapse, and the in-progress recovery efforts at the site. This piece will also discuss the economic impacts to the city and region as a result of the collapse and will look ahead at what to expect from a potential replacement crossing in the future. Part 1 - History of the Francis Scott Key Bridge (1977-2024) Planning for what was originally known as the “Baltimore Outer Harbor Crossing” began in the 1950s at the dawn of