Skip to main content

Albany Covered Bridge - New Hampshire

 


Located roughly six miles west of Conway along Swift River in the White Mountains of New Hampshire and near the very scenic Kancamagus Highway (NH 112), the Albany Covered Bridge is a popular stop for travelers taking the scenic route. The Albany Covered Bridge is a 120 foot long Paddleford truss covered bridge that was initially built in 1858, but was destroyed by a storm a year later which flooded the Swift River and swept away the new bridge. At that time, builders Almzi Russell and Leandre Morton entered into an agreement with the town of Albany to build a new covered bridge for $1,300, minus the amount previously paid for the original bridge. As a result of the agreement, the covered bridge was quickly rebuilt and has stood the test of time, along with a renovation in 1970. The artfully crafted covered bridge features wide shallow arches and sharply raked facades. In 1981 and 1982, the U.S. Forest Service replaced the wooden floor timbers with a steel floor for added support. Near the covered bridge is a mud sill, which was taken from the bed of the river to support the falsework and scaffolding during the construction of the bridge span.

Today, you can visit the Albany Covered Bridge off of Passaconaway Road if you are heading along NH 112. Some people may see the bridge on the way to the Covered Bridge Campground, other people may be traveling to the bridge to go fishing or get some neat photos of the Swift River and the covered bridge, while others (like myself the day I visited) may be stopping to see the bridge on the way to a further away destination. I visited during the early summer, but I'm told that the Albany Covered Bridge is picturesque in all seasons. If you are visiting the bridge, please be aware that there is a 7' 9" height restriction for vehicles using the bridge and that the bridge is closed to vehicles in the winter (but foot traffic is OK). There are some interpretive storyboards that can be seen around the bridge as well that will help tell the story of the bridge's construction. I was compelled to stop by and see the Albany Covered Bridge during a trip to New Hampshire and Maine in June 2013, and it was worth the stop.

View of the Swift River as seen from the Albany Covered Bridge.

And here's a couple views of the Albany Covered Bridge from the Swift River.


Side angle views of the Albany Covered Bridge.


The Swift River. This view must be an absolute gem during fall foliage season.

Approaching the Albany Covered Bridge.

The Swift River is a New Hampshire Protected River. The New Hampshire Protected Rivers are a part of the New Hampshire Rivers Management and Protection Program, which is designed to protect significant river resources through a combination of state and local resource management and protection.

A timber barrier has been set up to discourage drivers of oversized vehicles from driving across the Albany Covered Bridge




How to Get There:




Sources and Links:
NHTourGuide.com - Albany Covered Bridge (Kancamagus Highway Region)
USDA / White Mountain National Forest - Albany Covered Bridge
New Hampshire Covered Bridges - Albany Bridge
Bridgehunter.com - Albany Covered Bridge 29-02-06
Scenic USA - Albany Covered Bridge
KancamagusHighway.com - White Mountain National Forest Bridge (Aka Albany Covered Bridge)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Interstate 40 and the H-Bomb

Interstate 40 within California is entirely contained to San Bernandio County over a course of 155 miles from Interstate 15 in Barstow east to the Arizona State Line at the Colorado River.  Interstate 40 is aligned entirely in the Mojave Desert over the same general corridor established by US Route 66 and the National Old Trails Road.   Interstate 40 is known as the Needles Freeway and has an interesting backstory which included the prospect of the Bristol Mountains being excavated by way of nuclear blasts as part of Operation Carryall.   Part 1; the history of Interstate 40 in California The focus on this blog will be primarily centered around the construction of Interstate 40 ("I-40") within California.  That being said the corridor of automotive travel east of Barstow to the Arizona State Line was largely pioneered by the National Old Trails Road ("NOTR")   In April of 1912 the NOTR was organized with the goal of signing a trans-continental highway between Baltim

California State Route 232

This past month I drove the entirety of California State Route 232 in Ventura County. CA 232 is an approximately 4 miles State Highway aligned on Vineland Avenye which begins near Saticoy at CA 118 and traverses southwest to US Route 101 in Oxnard.  The alignment of CA 232 was first adopted into the State Highway System in 1933 as Legislative Route Number 154 according to CAhighways.org. CAhighways.org on LRN 154 As originally defined LRN 154 was aligned from LRN 9 (future CA 118) southwest to LRN 2/US 101 in El Rio.  This configuration of LRN 154 between CA 118/LRN 9 and US 101/LRN 2 can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Ventura County. 1935 Ventura County Highway Map According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 154 was extended west from US 101/LRN 2 to US 101A/LRN 60 in 1951.  Unfortunately State Highway Maps do not show this extension due to it being extremely small. During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 154 was assigned CA 232.  Of n

California State Route 128

California State Route 128 is a 121 mile State Highway which spans from California State Route 1 at the mouth Navarro River eastward to Interstate 505 near Winters.  California State Route 128 is one of California's most underrated scenic State Highways which traverses; Mendocino County, Solano County, Napa County and Yolo County.  Presently California State Route 128 has 11 unconstructed miles which would connect it from Interstate 505 east to California State Route 113 in Davis.   Part 1; the history of the original California State Route 28 and California State Route 128 What became California State Route 128 ("CA 128") was announced in the   August 1934 California Highways & Public Works  as the original CA 28.    CA 28 in it's original definition was aligned from CA 1 near Albion east to US 40 near Davis.   CA 28 as originally defined was comprised of numerous Legislative Route Numbers ("LRN") which were adopted as follows: -  LRN 1  between McDona