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Oregon? Absolutely!

 

The State of Oregon has been one of the most commonly featured states on Gribblenation for over two decades.  No doubt this is due to the vast amount of scenery and interesting highways Oregon has to offer.  This directory page is a compilation of all Gribblenation materials related to Oregon.  Do we feel you should visit Oregon?  In the immortal words of Doug Kerr on the original Gribblenation webpage, absolutely!


State Highways


Interstate 5 Marquam Bridge

Oregon Route 7

US Route 20 through Oregon's High Desert

US Route 26 between Oregon Route 7 an Oregon Route 19

US Route 26 Sunset Highway

US Route 26 Vista Ridge Tunnel

Early US Route 26 on Canyon Road and the Vista Avenue Bridge

Historic US Route 30 and the Historic Columbia River Highway

US Route 30 Astoria-Portland

Former US Route 30 on the Burnside Bridge

Oregon Route 31

Oregon Route 36

Oregon Route 38

Oregon Route 39 and California State Route 139

Oregon Route 58

Oregon Route 58 shield for $2,600.50

Oregon Route 62 Rogue Valley Expressway

Oregon Route 62

Oregon Route 78

Interstate 84 in the Columbia River Gorge to Portland

Oregon Route 86

US Route 95 and the ION Highway

Exploring the southern terminus of US Route 97 in Oregon and California

The fate of US Route 99W in downtown Portland

Astoria-Megler Bridge (US Route 101)

Siuslaw River Bridge (US Route 101)

Yaquina Bay Bridge (US Route 101)

Otter Crest Loop (former US Route 101)

US Route 101 from Cannon Beach to the Astoria-Megler Bridge

Neskowin Scenic Drive (former US Route 101)

Winnemucca to the Sea Highway (Oregon Route 140)

Jacob Conser Bridge Old US 99E/Oregon Route 164

US Route 197

US Route 199

Oregon Route 209

Oregon Route 217

Oregon Route 232

Oregon Route 238

Oregon Route 273 and early US Route 99 over Siskiyou Pass

Interstate 405


Other Roads


St. Johns Bridge

Bridge of the Gods

Morrison Bridge

1st Avenue MAX Light Rail

Hawthorne Bridge

Three Capes Scenic Route

Rocky Butte Road and Park


Covered Bridges


Wildcat Creek Covered Bridge

Graves Creek Covered Bridge

Pengra Covered Bridge

Lowell Covered Bridge

McKee Covered Bridge

Earnest Covered Bridge

Harris Covered Bridge

Ritner Creek Covered Bridge

Short Covered Bridge

Gallon House Bridge

Chitwood Covered Bridge

Stayton Jordan Covered Bridge

Deadwood Covered Bridge

Shimanek Covered Bridge

Hayden Covered Bridge

Coyote Creek Covered Bridge

Goodpasture Covered Bridge - Vida, Oregon


Parks, recreation, pages and other areas of interest


John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Rim Drive and the roads of Crater Lake National Park

The White Stag Sign

Portland Donut-scape

Chinatown Gateway

Washington Park

Battleship Oregon

Burlington North Railroad Bridge 5.1

Mount Hood from the air

Visit to Portland, Oregon

Oregon? Absolutely!

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