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Small Towns of Virginia Series

From Cumberland Gap - to the south shores of the Potomac - and the beaches along the Eastern Shore, Virginia has an endless amount of small towns and villages - each with their own unique history and story.  The Small Towns of Virginia Series explores these towns.  Some are tied to mountains and the music that echoed through the valleys, others have ties to Colonial and Revolutionary War periods, while others found themselves caught in the middle of the Civil War.

In addition, this series will also visit state and national parks withing the commonwealth along with other historical locations and items of interest.  We hope that after learning about these places here that you'll go out and explore for yourself these and the many other small towns of Virginia.


Southwestern Virginia:
West Central Virginia:
Southside Virginia:
Central Virginia:
  • Dillwyn
  • Jefferson's Monticello (in development)
  • Hanover
  • Madison's Montpelier (in development)
Northern Virginia:
Eastern Virginia:
  • Assateague Island National Seashore (in development)
  • Cape Charles
  • Silver Beach (in development)
Hampton Roads Area:
Related Sites:

For all photo or story inquiries - or if you have information to share - please feel free to comment or reach me directly at aprince27@gmail.com.


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