Skip to main content

Ritner Creek Covered Bridge - Oregon


Built in 1927 at a cost of $6,964, the 75 foot long Ritner Creek Covered Bridge alongside OR 223 near Pedee in Polk County, Oregon was the last covered bridge to be located on an Oregon state highway. Ritner Creek Bridge and Ritner Creek were named for pioneer Sebastian Ritner, who arrived in Oregon in 1845. At the time the Ritner Creek Bridge was built, there were about 450 covered bridges in Oregon. The bridge was built by Hamar and Curry, and during Charles Otis Hamar’s career, he was builder or contractor for many Howe Truss covered bridge structures such as the Ritner Creek Bridge, Five Rivers Fisher School Bridge on the Alsea River, Chitwood Bridge on Mary’s River, North Fork Yachats River Bridge and Drift Creek Bridge.

The Ritner Creek Covered Bridge almost became a memory in 1974. Declared structurally unsafe, it was scheduled for removal. The children of Pedee School along with the citizens in the Pedee area rallied to its support with a "Save our Bridge" campaign. The Polk County commissioners met with the state highway department and as a result the issue was placed on the ballot May 28, 1974. The measure passed and the covered bridge was lifted from its foundation and relocated just downstream of its original site to an adjacent site at the new Minnie Ritner Ruiter Wayside in 1976 at the cost of $26,031. The new concrete bridge on OR 223 parallels the Ritner Creek Bridge.
Plaque inside the bridge that gives a little history of the Ritner Creek Bridge.

A nice side angle of the bridge.
The inside of the bridge is quite spacious.

The modern concrete bridge over the Ritner Creek on OR 223 is next to the covered bridge.

Side angle view of the bridge.

Looking inside to the Ritner Creek Bridge.

View of the bridge from the north side of the creek.

A nice parting shot of the Ritner Creek Bridge.


How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
Ride With GPS - Western Valley: Ritner Creek Covered Bridge
Ritner Creek Covered Bridge - History of Ritner Creek Bridge
Polk County, Oregon - Ritner Creek Bridge
Oregon.com - Ritner Creek Covered Bridge
Bridgehunter.com - Ritner Creek Covered Bridge 37-27-01

Comments

Old Scout said…
Would you have any connection to a camera operator for the Jesse Stone series DAVID GRIBBLE


Popular posts from this blog

Interstate 40 and the H-Bomb

Interstate 40 within California is entirely contained to San Bernandio County over a course of 155 miles from Interstate 15 in Barstow east to the Arizona State Line at the Colorado River.  Interstate 40 is aligned entirely in the Mojave Desert over the same general corridor established by US Route 66 and the National Old Trails Road.   Interstate 40 is known as the Needles Freeway and has an interesting backstory which included the prospect of the Bristol Mountains being excavated by way of nuclear blasts as part of Operation Carryall.   Part 1; the history of Interstate 40 in California The focus on this blog will be primarily centered around the construction of Interstate 40 ("I-40") within California.  That being said the corridor of automotive travel east of Barstow to the Arizona State Line was largely pioneered by the National Old Trails Road ("NOTR")   In April of 1912 the NOTR was organized with the goal of signing a trans-continental highway between Baltim

California State Route 232

This past month I drove the entirety of California State Route 232 in Ventura County. CA 232 is an approximately 4 miles State Highway aligned on Vineland Avenye which begins near Saticoy at CA 118 and traverses southwest to US Route 101 in Oxnard.  The alignment of CA 232 was first adopted into the State Highway System in 1933 as Legislative Route Number 154 according to CAhighways.org. CAhighways.org on LRN 154 As originally defined LRN 154 was aligned from LRN 9 (future CA 118) southwest to LRN 2/US 101 in El Rio.  This configuration of LRN 154 between CA 118/LRN 9 and US 101/LRN 2 can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Ventura County. 1935 Ventura County Highway Map According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 154 was extended west from US 101/LRN 2 to US 101A/LRN 60 in 1951.  Unfortunately State Highway Maps do not show this extension due to it being extremely small. During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 154 was assigned CA 232.  Of n

California State Route 128

California State Route 128 is a 121 mile State Highway which spans from California State Route 1 at the mouth Navarro River eastward to Interstate 505 near Winters.  California State Route 128 is one of California's most underrated scenic State Highways which traverses; Mendocino County, Solano County, Napa County and Yolo County.  Presently California State Route 128 has 11 unconstructed miles which would connect it from Interstate 505 east to California State Route 113 in Davis.   Part 1; the history of the original California State Route 28 and California State Route 128 What became California State Route 128 ("CA 128") was announced in the   August 1934 California Highways & Public Works  as the original CA 28.    CA 28 in it's original definition was aligned from CA 1 near Albion east to US 40 near Davis.   CA 28 as originally defined was comprised of numerous Legislative Route Numbers ("LRN") which were adopted as follows: -  LRN 1  between McDona