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Prentiss Covered Bridge - Langdon, New Hampshire


The Prentiss Covered Bridge in Langdon, New Hampshire is the shortest historic covered bridge in the State of New Hampshire. Crossing the Great Brook, the 35 foot long through truss designed covered bridge was built in 1874 by Albert Granger, the Prentiss Covered Bridge is also known as the Drewsville Covered Bridge, named for a community located south of the bridge. It served the community until the bridge was bypassed in 1954, and now the bridge serves foot traffic for quiet reflection only. The bridge was restored between 1995 and 2001 for Langdon's bicentennial celebration, and then the bridge was rededicated in 2002. There is also a bench located near the bridge, which was placed at the bridge around the time of rededication.  The bridge was posted to the National Register of Historic Places on May 24, 1973.

The third bridge at this site, the Prentiss Covered Bridge was built for $1,000 with funds that were raised by the town. The date of the first bridge is unknown, but the second bridge was built in December 1791 at the cost of six pounds on land that had been cleared and settled by John Prentiss in 1785. In 1805, the Cheshire Turnpike Company took over the bridge as part of the turnpike from Canada to Boston, and indeed the road that parallels the bridge today is a successor road called the Cheshire Turnpike. 

Side profile of the Prentiss Covered Bridge.

Bridge portal.

There is a small piece of the old road that remains on the walk back to the Cheshire Turnpike, plus parking on the side of the road for a car.

Great Brook.

The Prentiss Covered Bridge is New Hampshire Covered Bridge #19 in New Hampshire's inventory of covered bridges.

One parting shot of the covered bridge.


How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
New Hampshire Covered Bridges - Prentiss Bridge
NHTourGuide.com - Prentiss Covered Bridge Langdon NH
Bridgehunter.com - Prentiss Covered Bridge 29-10-07
Ontfin.com - Drewsville (Prentiss) Covered Bridge, New Hampshire

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