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Plumweseep Covered Bridge - New Brunswick

 



Built in 1911 and located in Plumweseep, New Brunswick, the Plumweseep Covered Bridge is one of sixteen covered bridges in Kings County, with eight of the county's covered bridges located close to the nearby town of Sussex. Officially, the Plumweseep Bridge is known as the Kennebecasis River #9 Covered Bridge, noting that it is the ninth covered bridge to cross the Kennebecasis River. The Plumweseep Covered Bridge was built with a Howe truss covered bridge design and is 22.5 meters long, or roughly 74 feet in length.

The name Plumweseep comes from the term "Salmon River" in the Wolastoqey (Maliseet) language. While I didn't see any salmon along the Kennebecasis River when I was taking bridges of the Plumweseep Covered Bridge, there is parking and a place to launch a boat, canoe or kayak on the north side of the covered bridge. The bridge is a short drive up Plumweseep Road from NB 114 and NB 1. I certainly enjoyed visiting the Plumweseep Covered Bridge during my day tour of some of the great bridges in the southern part of the province of New Brunswick.


Headache bars are located on each side of the covered bridge to help prevent accidents that may compromise the bridge's structural integrity. One such accident happened in 2018 which caused the bridge to be closed for a few months for repairs.

Like many covered bridges in New Brunswick, there is a plaque that notes the name of the bridge plus the year it was built (or in this case, the year before the bridge was built).

The Kennebecasis River.

Another view of the peaceful Kennebecasis River. The river flows towards the west and southwest to the Saint John River.

Bridge name and clearance signs.

A nice side angle shot of the Plumweseep Covered Bridge, with plenty of lens flares.


How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
Explore Atlantic Canada - Romance of New Brunswick: Covered Bridges
Derek Grant Digital - Kennebecasis #9 Covered Bridge
BigDaddyKreativ.ca - Discovering the Iconic Covered Bridges of New Brunswick
Global News - Historic N.B. covered bridge closed while undergoing repairs
Explore NB - Covered bridges: New Brunswick’s iconic link from past to present
GalenFrysinger.com - Plumweseep Covered Bridge
Explore NB - Kennebecasis River No. 9 Covered Bridge (Plumweseep)

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