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Rexleigh Covered Bridge

Located just outside of picturesque Salem, New York, the Rexleigh Covered Bridge is one of four covered bridges that are still standing in Washington County, and one of thee covered bridges that cross the Batten Kill while in New York. There are more covered bridges that cross the Batten Kill in neighboring Vermont. The Rexleigh Covered Bridge is also the location for a popular swimming hole. The 107 foot long bridge was originally built by Reuben Comins and George Wadsworth in 1874 and is one of only three Howe truss bridges remaining in New York State. The bridge was supposedly prefabricated in Troy, New York and transported by rail to Rexleigh where it was reassembled in place. One unique feature of the Rexleigh Covered Bridge are the cast iron shoes, which were used to fit the bridge timbers into joints with iron rods. This feature has been incorporated into no other known covered bridge in the United States of America.

The Rexleigh Covered Bridge has had its share of events over the years. A number of flooding events almost washed the bridge downstream or caused the bridge supports to settle. By 1979, a decision to demolish and replace the bridge was made, but thanks to local support, the old covered bridge was saved. In 1984 and again in 2007, the bridge was rehabilitated. If you visit the bridge today, you will find a quiet pastoral scene. Looking at the Batten Kill from the bridge, there are remnants of what looks like an old mill upstream from the bridge as well. So there are many reasons to enjoy this quiet, red covered bridge.

Old mill?

Looking upstream at the Batten Kill.

One of the portals to the covered bridge.

Side profile of the Rexleigh Covered Bridge.

The area around the bridge is also a popular swimming hole.


Sources and Links:
New York State Covered Bridge Society - Rexleigh Covered Bridge
Town of Salem, New York - Around The Town

How to Get There:

Crossposted to http://unlockingnewyork.blogspot.com/2018/02/rexleigh-covered-bridge.html

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