Skip to main content

Oregon Route 62 Rogue Valley Expressway

Much of Oregon Route 62 recently in the Medford Area has been moved from Crater Lake Highway to the Rogue Valley Expressway. 

The Rogue Valley Expressway is a 4.5 mile segment of Oregon Route 62 ("OR 62") which is a limited access bypass of Crater Lake Highway.  The Rogue Valley Expressway begins just south of OR 140 and terminates about a half mile from Interstate 5 ("I-5").  The Rogue Valley Expressway was intended to expedite travel between Medford and White City.  


Part 1; the background of the Rogue Valley Expressway

Much of the history of the Rogue Valley Expressway is discussed in the May issue of ODOT Moving Ahead.  According to ODOT Moving Ahead concepts to move OR 62 from Crater Lake Highway between Medford and White City began to emerge in the 1990s  In 2004 project teams met to narrow down the possible design concepts which would be evaluated for Environmental Impact Statements.  The Rogue Valley Expressway was funded in 2009 via $120 million dollars set aside as part of the Oregon Jobs & Transportation Act.  Construction of the Rogue Valley Expressway began in May 2016 and would open to traffic as mainline OR 62 in May 2019.  



 

Part 2; a drive on the Rogue Valley Expressway

As noted above OR 62 joins the Rogue Valley Expressway just south of OR 140 and White City.  OR 62 westbound makes a right turn off of Crater Lake Highway onto the Rogue Valley Expressway.  The former surface alignment of OR 62 on Crater Lake Highway is signed OR 62 Business.  




Despite being fully limited access and not having any interchanges the Rogue Valley Expressway is signed at a typical Oregon 55 MPH urban freeway speed.


The Rogue Valley Expressway makes a southward jog towards Medford and enters the City Limits at Vilas Road overpass. 





The Rogue Valley Expressway skirts the eastern edge of Rogue Valley International-Medford Airport and merges back into Crater Lake Highway approaching I-5. 









Comments

Unknown said…
This comment has been removed by the author.
According to the first draft map, the bypass was going to extend further up current OR-62 to White City. There would have been interchanges at Vilas Road, OR-62 (at or near the current northern end of the bypass) and OR-140 (as a cloverleaf). The 2013 FEIS selected a different longer routing: White City would be bypassed to the west to Dutton Road, eliminating the 140 cloverleaf but adding partial interchanges at existing OR-62 at both ends of White City. The interchange at Vilas road also changed from an SPUI to a tight diamond interchange. At some point, the project was rolled back or split into phase; the Vilas Road interchange was removed, and the bypass now ends at OR-62 between Corey Road and Gregory Road.

Popular posts from this blog

California State Route 232

This past month I drove the entirety of California State Route 232 in Ventura County. CA 232 is an approximately 4 miles State Highway aligned on Vineland Avenye which begins near Saticoy at CA 118 and traverses southwest to US Route 101 in Oxnard.  The alignment of CA 232 was first adopted into the State Highway System in 1933 as Legislative Route Number 154 according to CAhighways.org. CAhighways.org on LRN 154 As originally defined LRN 154 was aligned from LRN 9 (future CA 118) southwest to LRN 2/US 101 in El Rio.  This configuration of LRN 154 between CA 118/LRN 9 and US 101/LRN 2 can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Ventura County. 1935 Ventura County Highway Map According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 154 was extended west from US 101/LRN 2 to US 101A/LRN 60 in 1951.  Unfortunately State Highway Maps do not show this extension due to it being extremely small. During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 154 was assigned CA 232.  Of n

Former US Route 50 and the South Lincoln Highway from Folsom east to Placerville

The corridor of Folsom of Sacramento County east to Placerville of El Dorado County has been a long established corridor of overland travel dating back to the California Gold Rush.  The Folsom-Placerville corridor was once part of the path of the Lake Tahoe Wagon Road which became the first California State Highway and later the South Lincoln Highway.  In time the South Lincoln Highway's surface alignment was inherited by US Route 50.  The Folsom-Placerville corridor also includes the communities of; Clarksville, Shingle Springs and El Dorado. Part 1; the history of the Lake Tahoe Wagon Road, South Lincoln Highway and US Route 50 through Folsom-Placerville Folsom is located on the American River/Lake Natoma of eastern Sacramento County.  That lands now occupied by the City of Folsom were part of Rancho Rio de los Americanos prior to the finding of gold at Sutter's Mill during 1848.  During the California Gold Rush the lands of Rancho Rio de los Americanos were purchased by Jose

Legacy of US Route 466 Part 3; Morro Bay to Shandon via Rocky Canyon

Part 3 of the US Route 466 Legacy series consists of the roadways that made up the highway between Morro Bay and Shandon of San Luis Obispo County.  The San Luis Obispo County segment of US Route 466 is notable due to it having been carried via a dirt segment through Rocky Canyon from 1933 to 1958.  Pictured in the cover photo of this blog is former US Route 466 facing westward into Rocky Canyon. Part 1 and Part 2 of the US Route 466 Legacy Series can be found below: Legacy of US Route 466 Part 1; California State Route 46 Legacy of US Route 466 Part 2; Tehachapi to Bakersfield  Part 1; mapping early US Route 466 in San Luis Obispo County As discussed in Part 1 of the US Route 466 Legacy series the western terminus of US Route 466 ("US 466") from it's inception until truncation in the 1965 was located in Morro Bay at California State Route 1 ("CA 1"). US 466 between Morro Bay and Shandon had two two primary alignments through it's history.  The initia