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Hawaii Route 80

Hawaii Route 80 is an approximately 2-mile State Highway located on the Island of O'ahu.  Hawaii Route 80 is a component of the Kamehameha Highway which begins at Hawaii Route 99 immediately north of Interstate H-2 Exit 8 in Wahiawa.  Hawaii Route 80 follows the Kamehameha Highway north through Wahiawa crossing the waters of Wahiawa Reservoir twice before terminating at Hawaii Route 99.  Pictured above is the 1932 Karsten Thot Bridge which carries Hawaii Route 80 over the Wahiawa Reservoir north of Wahiawa.

This page is part of the Gribblenation O'ahu Highways page.  All Gribblenation and Roadwaywiz media related to the highway system of O'ahu can be found at the link below:

https://www.gribblenation.org/p/gribblenation-oahu-highways-page.html


Part 1; the history of Hawaii Route 80

Prior to the Statehood the first signed highways within Hawaii Territory came into existence during World War II.   During World War II the territory of Hawaii saw an influx of military activity following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941.  Numerous Military Routes and early Hawaii Routes were signed through the Hawaiian Territory to aid military personnel in navigating the islands.  Military Highways were assigned US Route style shields whereas lesser highways were assigned an early variation of what is now the Hawaii Route Spade.  The Kamehameha Highway through Wahiawa is shown assigned as part of Military Route 1.  A full version of the 1946 Army Map of O'ahu can be seen on hawaiihighways.com here.  


Circa 1955 following the conclusion of World War II the United States Bureau of Public Roads renumbered the Hawaii Route System.  The 1955 Hawaii Route Renumbering saw most of the conventions utilized by the current Hawaii State Route System established.  Primary Hawaii Routes were given two-digit numbers whereas Secondary Hawaii Routes were given three-digit numbers.  The Hawaii Routes were assigned in sequence for what Island/County they were located on coupled with what Federal Aid Program number they were tied to.  In the case of O'ahu the Island was assigned numbers in the range of 60-99.  Hawaii Route 80 was assigned to the Kamehameha Highway from Hawaii Route 99 through Wahiawa north to Hawaii Route 82 and onwards to Hawaii Route 99 via Kaukonahua Road.  

Hawaii Route 80 can be seen on the 1959 Gousha Map of Hawaii in the vicinity of Wahiawa.

It is unclear when Hawaii Route 80 was truncated but it appears to have occurred when Hawaii Route 99 was realigned over Hawaii Route 82 north of Wahiawa.  What was Hawaii Route 80 on Kaukonahua Road is shown on the 1983 USGS Map of the Wahiawa Area as Hawaii Route 801.  Hawaii Route 80 is shown with what appears to be a dual northern terminus at Hawaii Route 99 via Kamehameha Highway and Kaukonahua Road.  It is unclear when Hawaii Route 801 was decommissioned as there is no longer any reassurance shields.  According to hawaiihighways.com Hawaii Route 80 still has a dual northern terminus at Hawaii Route 99 but field signage only indicates it is via Kamehameha Highway. 


Part 2; a drive on Hawaii Route 80

Northbound Hawaii Route 80 begins on Kamehameha Highway south of Wahiawa when Hawaii Route 99 splits onto Wilikina Drive.  

Hawaii Route 80 northbound follows Kamehameha Highway over the Wahiawa Reservoir and passes through Wahiawa.  Departing Wahiawa Hawaii Route 80 northbound crosses the 1932 Karsten Thot Bridge.  The Karsten Thot Bridge 213.9-foot-long Warren Through Truss Span which was renovated during 2015. 

North of the Karsten Thot Bridge Hawaii Route 80 intersects Hawaii Route 7012 (former Hawaii Route 804) at Whitmore Avenue.  

Northbound Hawaii Route 80 intersects former its original alignment and former Hawaii Route 801 at Kaukonahua Road.  



Hawaii Route 80 northbound follows Kamehameha Highway to a terminus at Hawaii Route 99.  


Southbound Hawaii Route 80 begins on Kamehameha Highway starting from Hawaii Route 99 as the latter splits onto Kamananui Road.  


Southbound Hawaii Route 80 intersects former its original alignment and former Hawaii Route 801 at Kaukonahua Road.  At Whitmore Avenue southbound Hawaii Route 80 intersects Hawaii Route 7012. 


Southbound crosses the Karsten Thot Bridge, passes through Wahiawa on Kamehameha Highway and terminates at Hawaii Route 99 south of the Wahiawa Reservoir. 


Strangely a Hawaii Route 80 shield with "Hawaii" in the Spade crest on Kaukonahua Road when Dan Murphy drove it during early 2019.  The current Google Street View image from July 2019 shows the shield has been removed.  The specification Hawaii Route shield below is of 1971 vintage according to Jake Bear of the AAroads Shield Gallery



During May of 2019 Dan Murphy of the Roadwaywiz YouTube Channel and Gribblenation featured real-time drives on Hawaii Route 80.  Below Hawaii Route 80 can be viewed northbound from Hawaii Route 99.  


Below Hawaii Route 80 can be viewed southbound from Hawaii Route 99. 

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