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Oahu and Maui Highways

Welcome to the Gribblenation Oahu and Maui Highways Page, your destination to find all things related to the road network of the Hawaiian Islands of Oahu and Maui.  Below you find a compilation of all existing Gribblenation and Roadwaywiz media related to the highway networks of Oahu and Maui.  Pictured above is northbound Hawaii Route 63 on the Likelike Highway descending from the John H. Wilson Tunnels of the Koolau Range towards Interstate H-3.  


An intro the highway networks of Oahu and Maui

Prior to the Statehood the first signed highways within Hawaii Territory came into existence during World War II.   During World War II the territory of Hawaii saw an influx of military activity following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.  Numerous Military Routes and early Hawaii Routes were signed through the Hawaiian Territory to aid military personnel in navigating the islands.  Military Highways were assigned US Route style shields whereas lesser highways were assigned an early variation of what is now the Hawaii Route Spade.  

A 1946 Army Map of the Island of Oahu shows the existing Military and Hawaii Routes during the World War II era.  There is no indication that any World War II era Military and Hawaii Routes were located on Maui.  A full version of the 1946 Army Map of Oahu can be seen on hawaiihighways.com here


Circa 1955 following the conclusion of World War II the United States Bureau of Public Roads renumbered the Hawaii Route System.  The 1955 Hawaii Route Renumbering saw most of the conventions utilized by the current Hawaii State Route System established.  Primary Hawaii Routes were given two-digit numbers whereas Secondary Hawaii Routes were given three-digit numbers.  The Hawaii Routes were assigned in sequence for what Island/County they were located on coupled with what Federal Aid Program number they were tied to.  In the case of Oahu, it was assigned numbers in the range of 60-99 whereas Maui was assigned numbers in the range of 30-40.  

The initial 1955 Hawaii Route network on Oahu and Maui can be viewed on the 1959 Gousha Road Map of Hawaii



On August 21, 1959, Hawaii became the 50th State which saw it's profile rise significantly.  The Interstate System in Hawaii was authorized as part of the 1960 Statehood Act.  The 1960 Statehood Act authorized Interstates H-1, H-2 and H-3 on the Island of Oahu.  Interstate H-4 was proposed as a supplemental freeway in Honolulu during 1968 but was never approved for construction.

Interstate H-2 was fully completed and opened to traffic February 21, 1977, which was followed by Intestate H-1 being fully completed by May 1986.   On April 6, 1988, the Honolulu Division Administrator of the Hawaii Department of Transportation submitted a request to the Federal Highway Administration to add entirety of Hawaii Route 78 and the Moanalua Freeway to the Interstate System as Interstate H-1A.  On November 1, 1989, The Federal Highway Administration informed the Hawaii Department of Transportation that Hawaii Route 78/Moanalua Freeway was approved to be added to the Interstate System as Interstate H-1A.  On December 8, 1990, the AASHTO Executive Committee approved the designation of Interstate H-201 on the Moanalua Freeway.

The corridor of Interstate H-3 was the most contentious of the constructed Interstates on Oahu and would open to traffic across the Koolau Range on December 12, 1997.  




Gribblenation Oahu blog directory





























Diamond Head State Monument


Gribblenation and Roadwaywiz Oahu Highway related media

The Roads of Oahu (Just Passing Through #10)

Roadwaywiz Hawaii Highways YouTube Playlist

Roadwaywiz 10k Subscribers Special: Hawaii Interstates Recap & Discussion

Wiz Webinar: The Interstates & Freeways of Oahu


Gribblenation Maui blog directory

Hawaii Route 30 and Hawaii Route 3000

Piilani Highway (Hawaii Route 31 and Maui County Route 31)

Hawaii Route 32, 32A, 32B and 32 Bypass

Maui County Route 33

Hana Highway (Hawaii Route 36, Hawaii Route 360 and Maui County Route 31)

Hawaii Route 36A to Kahului Airport

Haleakala Highway (Hawaii Routes 36A, 37, 377 and 378)

Maui County Route 305, Maui County Route 365 and former Hawaii Route 40

Hawaii Route 310

Hawaii Route 311

Kahekili Highway (Maui County Route 330, Hawaii Route 340, Maui County Route 340 and Hawaii Route 30)

Maui County Route 370

Hawaii Route 380

Maui County Route 390

Hawaii Route 3400

Hawaii Route 3500

Unsigned Hawaii Route 3600 on the Paia Mini-Bypass

Hawaii Route 3800 to Kahului Airport

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