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Hawaii Route 83

Hawaii Route 83 is a 43.90 mile State Highway which laps the northern tip of the Island of O'ahu.  Hawaii Route 83 beings at Hale'iwa at Hawaii Route 99 and laps clockwise around the northern tip of O'ahu to a terminus at Hawaii Route 61 in Maunawili.  Much of Hawaii Route 83 is signed on the Kamehameha Highway but not the entirety of the highway.  Hawaii Route 83 in Hale'iwa is signed on the Joseph P. Leong Highway and a portion in Kaneo'he diverges onto the Kahekili Highway.  The Kamehameha Highway is named in reference to Kamehameha I who conquered the Hawaiian Islands and united them as the Kingdom of Hawaii. 

This page is part of the Gribblenation O'ahu Highways page.  All Gribblenation and Roadwaywiz media related to the highway system of O'ahu can be found at the link below:

https://www.gribblenation.org/p/gribblenation-oahu-highways-page.html


Part 1; the history of Hawaii Route 83

The future corridor of Hawaii Route 72 and the Kamehameha Highway can be seen traversing eastern O'ahu from Hale'iwa to Maunawili  he 1881 C.J. Lyons Map of O'ahu during the era of the Kingdom of Hawaii.  




The Hawaiian Kingdom was overthrown during 1893 and was annexed by the United States on August 12th, 1898.  The future Hawaii Route 83 and Kamehameha Highway can be seen as Government Road in the Hale'iwa-Maunawili corridor the 1899 J.T. Taylor Map of O'ahu.  Much of the Kamehameha Highway from Hale'iwa across the northern tip of O'ahu is shown running along side the O'ahu Railway to Laie Point.  Hawaii Territory was created April 30th, 1900.  



Prior to the Statehood the first signed highways within Hawaii Territory came into existence during World War II.   During World War II the territory of Hawaii saw an influx of military activity following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941.  Numerous Military Routes and early Hawaii Routes were signed through the Hawaiian Territory to aid military personnel in navigating the islands.  Military Highways were assigned US Route style shields whereas lesser highways were assigned an early variation of what is now the Hawaii Route Spade.  

A 1946 Army Map of the Island of O'ahu shows the primary road between Hale'iwa-Maunawili as part of Military Route 1.  A full version of the 1946 Army Map of O'ahu can be seen on hawaiihighways.com here



Circa 1955 following the conclusion of World War II the United States Bureau of Public Roads renumbered the Hawaii Route System.  The 1955 Hawaii Route Renumbering saw most of the conventions utilized by the current Hawaii State Route System established.  Primary Hawaii Routes were given two digit numbers whereas Secondary Hawaii Routes were given three digit numbers.  The Hawaii Routes were assigned in sequence for what Island/County they were located on coupled with what Federal Aid Program number they were tied to.  In the case of O'ahu the Island was assigned numbers in the range of 60-99.  In the case of Kamehameha Highway the Hale'iwa-Maunawili corridor it was assigned part of Hawaii Route 83.  A far more detailed explanation of the 1955 Hawaii Route Renumbering can be found at hawaiihighways.com here

The original scale of Hawaii Route 72 can be seen below on the 1959 Gousha Map of Hawaii.  Unlike the modern alignment Hawaii Route 83 is shown following the Kamehameha Highway through Hale'iwa and Kanoe'he.  Hawaii Route 83 is shown originating at the Farrington Highway when it was part of Hawaii Route 99.  On August 21st, 1959 Hawaii became the 50th State which saw it's profile rise significantly. 



According to hawaiihighways.com Hawaii Route 83 was moved onto the 
Kahekili Highway bypass of Kaneo'he when the realignment was completed during March 1972.  Former Hawaii Route 83 in Kaneo'he on the Kamehameha Highway became Honolulu County Route 836 (sometimes displayed on maps as Hawaii Route 830).  During the 1990s Joseph P. Leong Highway bypassed the Kamehameha Highway in Hale'iwa which saw Hawaii Route 83 realigned.   Since the opening of the Joseph P. Leong Highway Hawaii Route 83 has remained unchanged.


Part 2; a drive on Hawaii Route 83 from Hawaii Route 61 to Kualoa Ranch

Counter clockwise Hawaii Route 83/Kamehameha Highway begins from Hawaii Route 61/Pali Highway in Maunawili.




Hawaii Route 83/Kamehameha Highway northbound intersects Interstate H-3 and enters Kāneʻohe.





Hawaii Route 83 northbound enters Kāneʻohe on the Kamehameha Highway.  Approaching unsigned Hawaii Route 65/Kāneʻohe Bay Drive the alignment of Hawaii Route 83 northbound is shown as "TO Hawaii Route 83" via left hand turn onto the beginning of Hawaii Route 63 on the Likelike Highway.  Originally Hawaii Route 83 northbound would have continued on Kamehameha Highway via what is now unsigned Honolulu County 836 through Kāneʻohe.




Hawaii Route 83 northbound splits from Hawaii Route 63 west of Kamo'oali'i Stream onto the Kahekili Highway.  Kahaluu is signed as 5 miles northward whereas as Laie is signed as 23 miles northward as Hawaii Route 83 splits from the Likelike Highway.








Hawaii Route 83 northbound follows the Kahekili Highway bypass of Kāneʻohe and rejoins the Kamehameha Highway at Kahaluu.











Hawaii Route 83 northbound passes through Waikane and approaches the waters of Kāneʻohe Bay at Kauloa Regional Park.  

















Chinaman's Hat Island ("Mokoli'i") can be seen the waters of Kāneʻohe Bay facing east towards Marine Corps Base Hawaii from Kualoa Regional Park. 


Kualoa Ranch can be found on Hawaii Route 83 immediately north of Kualoa Regional Park.


Kualoa Ranch lies with Kualoa Valley which flanks the Ko'olau Range and is considered a sacred Hawaiian sacred site.  In 1850 American Doctor Gerrit P. Judd purchased 622 acres from Kamehameha III and founded Kualoa Ranch.  The Gerritt Judd purchased an additional 2,200 acres of Kualoa Valley in 1860.  From 1863-1870 Charles Judd operated a sugarcane planation at Kualoa Ranch the ruins of which can be seen below.  The Judd family would ultimately purchase another 1,188 acres of Kualoa Valley which forms the modern basis of Kualoa Ranch.  





During World War II Kualoa Ranch was occupied by the U.S. Army.  Kualoa Airfield was constructed during 1942 and incorporated part of the Kamehameha Highway as part of the runway.  After the conclusion of World War II Kualoa Ranch was turned over back to the Judd Family.  In modern times Kualoa Ranch is most popularly known as a movie background.  Below the grounds of Kualoa Ranch alongside the Kamehameha Highway can be seen.




One of the World War II era bunkers of Kualoa Airfield. 








Battery Cooper as featured on the Kualoa Ranch tour.



























Marine Corps Base Hawaii from Battery Cooper. 


Hawaii Route 83 facing northbound from Battery Cooper.


Views of Kualoa Valley around Ka'a'awa Stream.





A warehouse used in Jumanji; Welcome to the Jungle.



A familiar backdrop of Jurassic Park can be seen looking westward into Kualoa Valley.


An assortment of movie props can be found within Kualoa Valley.










Part 3; a drive on former Hawaii Route 83 via Honolulu County 836 on the Kamehameha Highway

Modern Hawaii Route 83 southbound splits from the Kamehameha Highway onto the Kahekili Highway at Kahaluu.  The older alignment of Hawaii Route 83 on the Kamehameha Highway south from Kahaluu to Kāneʻohe is now unsigned Honolulu County Route 836.  


Honolulu County Route 836/Kamehameha Highway southbound follows the shore of Kāneʻohe Bay towards He'eia State Park.


















Honolulu County Route 836/Kamehameha Highway southbound crosses He'eia and enters central Kāneʻohe.  












Honolulu County Route 836/Kamehameha Highway southbound passes through Kāneʻohe and terminates at Hawaii Route 83 at the Hawaii Route 63/65 junction.







During June of 2019 Dan Murphy of the Roadwaywiz Youtube Channel and Gribblenation featured real-time drives along Honolulu County Route 836.  Below Honolulu County Route 836 can be viewed southbound.


Below Honolulu County Route 836 can be viewed northbound.





Part 4; Roadwaywiz on Hawaii Route 83

During June of 2019 Dan Murphy of the Roadwaywiz Youtube Channel and Gribblenation featured real-time drives along Hawaii Route 83.  Below Hawaii Route 83 can be viewed clockwise from Hawaii Route 99 to Hawaii Route 61. 










Below Hawaii Route 83 can be viewed counter clockwise from Hawaii Route 61 to Hawaii Route 99. 













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