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Halpin Covered Bridge - New Haven, Vermont

 


Located near Middlebury, Vermont, the Halpin Covered Bridge is Vermont's highest covered bridge above a stream bed. Spanning 41 feet over a natural waterfall on Muddy Branch of the New Haven River, the 66 foot long Town lattice through truss designed covered bridge was originally built in 1824. It was originally built to serve one of the state's earliest marble excavations, the Halpin quarry at Marble Ledge. While the quarry is no longer in use, the bridge is now maintained by the town and serves a farm run by the Halpin family. The original bridge abutments were marble, perhaps coming from the nearby marble quarry.

Also known as the High Covered Bridge, the Halpin Covered Bridge is one of the oldest covered bridges in Vermont. It was rehabilitated in 1994 by builder Jan Lewandowski. While the covered bridge abutments are now made of concrete, the bridge looks to be in good shape for generations to come. The bridge on Halpin Covered Bridge Road can fit one lane of traffic, has a clearance of 9 feet, 9 inches through its portal, and a weight limit of 8 tons. I've had the chance to visit the Halpin Covered Bridge on a couple of occasions, and it is a pleasure to see in all seasons.









How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
Addison County Chamber of Commerce - Covered Bridges
Bridgehunter.com - Halpin Covered Bridge 45-01-03
Vermont Covered Bridge Society - The Halpin Covered Bridge
The Travels of Tug 44 - Halpin High Covered Bridge

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