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Pennsylvania Turnpike Collection

The Pennsylvania Turnpike may be one of the most popular subjects to many road enthusiasts.  Though today's Turnpike is faced with numerous issues and concerns, the highway's quirky uniqueness and links to the past allows for a romantic charm to the turnpike that many modern highways lack. 

So sit back and relax as you travel abandoned roadways, stop at an original service plaza, view vintage photos, or get some religion turnpike style.  Even if you don't live in Pennsylvania or travel the turnpike you can complete your virtual journey on America's First Super Highway!




Abandoned Turnpike: The nearly 13 miles of road in South Central Pennsylvania attracts curiosity seekers of all types.
Vintage Views: Historic photos and postcards of the Turnpike
Uniquely Turnpike: Items you won't find on any other Interstate or highway for that matter either.
Breezewood: Some enjoy it - many are indifferent - and most hate it.  Learn more about the most unique spot in the Turnpike and perhaps the entire Interstate System
Other Turnpike Items:

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