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Moores Mills Covered Bridge - Waterford, New Brunswick

  One of two remaining covered bridges over the Trout Creek in Waterford, New Brunswick is the Moores Mills Covered Bridge. Upstream from the nearby Urney Covered Bridge , the Moores Mills Covered Bridge is one of a plethora of covered bridges to be discovered near Sussex, New Brunswick and along the back way to the Fundy Trail Parkway by way of Adair's Wilderness Lodge. Also known as Trout Creek Bridge #5, the Moores Mills Covered Bridge was built in 1923. This bridge is built using a Howe truss design for covered bridges, much like some of the other covered bridges found nearby. The bridge spans 64 feet long, or about 19 meters in length, and unlike some other covered bridges I've encountered in New Brunswick, I didn't find a headache bar on the road leading up to the bridge. I enjoyed the Moores Mills Bridge for its peaceful settings and surroundings. While I did not dip my feet into Trout Creek on that early May morning I visited, it is said that the creek is usually sh

Urney Covered Bridge - Waterford, New Brunswick

  The Urney Covered Bridge is one of a bunch of covered bridges that you will find in the area surrounding Sussex, New Brunswick. Heading east towards Waterford from Sussex on Waterford Road, one of the back ways to the Fundy Trail Parkway, you can find a couple of covered bridges just off the main road over the Trout Creek. While I found that the Fundy Trail Parkway was not yet open for the season when I visited, the drive there was still enjoyable. One of the covered bridges I encountered along the way is the Urney Covered Bridge, also known as Trout Creek # 4, on Urney Road in Waterford. The covered bridge was built in 1905 using a Howe truss design for construction. This bridge is about 68 feet long, or about 20 meters, as it crosses Trout Creek. Among the features are a triangular portal that you'll find with many covered bridges within New Brunswick. Plus with many covered bridges that I encountered within the province, a headache bar has been installed to help prevent over h

Whitetop Mountain Road - Virginia

  At 5,520 feet above sea level, Whitetop Mountain is the second highest mountain in Virginia and the highest point that can be publicly accessed by a motor vehicle. Not far from Virginia's highest mountain, Mount Rogers, Whitetop Mountain offers breathtaking views of southwest Virginia's Grayson Highlands and towards the mountains of neighboring North Carolina and Tennessee. Using Whitetop Mountain Road (Forest Road 89) from Virginia Secondary Route 600, it is a climb of roughly 1.6 miles with plenty of switchbacks and an elevation change of roughly 1,000 feet towards the summit. Whitetop Mountain is also fairly close to I-81, about a 20 minute drive from Chilhowie, and even closer from US 58. Whitetop Mountain Road itself is a sturdy gravel road. There are some ruts and rocks that you will need to keep in mind as you drive up the road, but I would say that most vehicles with some clearance can clear their way around the dips on their way to some unforgettable scenic vistas to

Former California State Route 152 east of Pacheco through the San Luis Reservoir

Dinosaur Point Road east of Pacheco Pass to the waters of the San Luis Reservoir is the original alignment of California State Route 152.  Since July 1965, California State Route 152 has been realigned east of Pacheco Pass via a modernized expressway.  The original alignment of California State Route 152 on occasion reemerges from the San Luis Reservoir at Dinosaur Point.  Pictured above as the blog cover is the original alignment of California State Route 152 at Dinosaur Point disappearing eastward into the waters of the San Luis Reservoir.  Below California State Route 152 can be seen passing through what is now the San Luis Reservoir east of Pacheco Pass on the 1935 Division of Highways Map of Merced County. Part 1; the history of California State Route 152 east of Pacheco Pass through the San Luis Reservoir site The present site of the San Luis Reservoir during the era of Alta California was part of Rancho San Luis Gonzaga.  Rancho San Luis Gonzaga was granted to Francisco Jose Riv