Skip to main content

Hawaii Route 7012

Hawaii Route 7012 is a 1.9-mile State Highway located on the Island of O'ahu.  Hawaii Route 7012 begins at Hawaii Route 80/Kamehameha Highway and follows Whitmore Avenue east to the Wahiawa Naval Reservation.  Hawaii Route 7012 was once assigned as Hawaii Route 804 and still appears as such on some maps.  

This page is part of the Gribblenation O'ahu Highways page.  All Gribblenation and Roadwaywiz media related to the highway system of O'ahu can be found at the link below:

https://www.gribblenation.org/p/gribblenation-oahu-highways-page.html


Part 1; the history of Hawaii Route 7012

Prior to the Statehood the first signed highways within Hawaii Territory came into existence during World War II.   During World War II the territory of Hawaii saw an influx of military activity following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941.  Numerous Military Routes and early Hawaii Routes were signed through the Hawaiian Territory to aid military personnel in navigating the islands.  Military Highways were assigned US Route style shields whereas lesser highways were assigned an early variation of what is now the Hawaii Route Spade.  

A 1946 Army Map of the Island of O'ahu shows the future corridor of Hawaii Route 7012 is shown to partially be on the alignment of Hawaii Route 124.  Hawaii Route 124 is shown diverging from Whitmore Avenue onto what is now Saipan Drive.  A full version of the 1946 Army Map of O'ahu can be seen on hawaiihighways.com here


Circa 1955 following the conclusion of World War II the United States Bureau of Public Roads renumbered the Hawaii Route System.  The 1955 Hawaii Route Renumbering saw most of the conventions utilized by the current Hawaii State Route System established.  Primary Hawaii Routes were given two-digit numbers whereas Secondary Hawaii Routes were given three-digit numbers.  The Hawaii Routes were assigned in sequence for what Island/County they were located on coupled with what Federal Aid Program number they were tied to.  In the case of Whitmore Avenue it was not assigned one of the initial post-1955 Hawaii Route numbers.  Whitmore Avenue can be seen on the 1959 Gousha Highway Map of Hawaii branching east from Hawaii Route 80/Kamehameha Highway near Wahiawa. 


The post-1955 designation history of Whitmore Avenue isn't fully clear, but it can be seen as Hawaii Route 804 on the 1983 USGS Map of Wahiawa.  



For unknown reasons Whitmore Avenue appears as both Hawaii Route 804 and Hawaii Route 7012 on the 2017 USGS Map of Wahiawa. 



Part 2; a drive on Hawaii Route 7012

North of the Karsten Thot Bridge Hawaii Route 80/Kamehameha Highway intersects Hawaii Route 7012 at Whitmore Avenue.  No route number is seen on Hawaii Route 80 northbound at Whitmore Avenue. 

At Whitmore Avenue southbound Hawaii Route 80 intersects Hawaii Route 7012.  From southbound Hawaii Route 80 southbound a single Hawaii Route 7012 shield can be found. 

During June 2019 Dan Murphy of the Roadwaywiz YouTube Channel (and Gribblenation) featured real-time drives on Hawaii Route 7012.  Below eastbound Hawaii Route 7012 on Whitmore Avenue can be observed. 

Below westbound Hawaii Route 7012 on Whitmore Avenue can be observed.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

California State Route 190; a Trans-Sierra Highway that could have been

This past week I decided to take a small scale road trip on California State Route 190 from CA 99 east to the unbuilt section over the Sierra Nevada Range.  While I was in for what turned out to be a fun drive following the course of the Tule River watershed what I found researching the back story of CA 190 was one of the most complex and unusual stories of any California State Highway.  Given that I had a ton of older photos of the eastern segment of CA 190 in the Mojave Desert of Inyo County I thought it was time to put something together for the entire route. The simplified story of CA 190 is that it is a 231 mile state highway that has a 43 mile unbuilt gap in the Sierra Nevada Range.  CA 190 is an east/west State Highway running from CA 99 in Tulare County at Tipton east to CA 127 located in Death Valley Junction near the Nevada State Line in rural Inyo County.  The routing CA 190 was adopted into the State Highway system as Legislative Route 127 which was adopted in 1933 acc

Old US Route 40 on Donner Pass Road

While completing California State Route 89 between Lassen Volcanic National Park and US Route I took a detour in Truckee up the infamous Donner Pass Road. Generally I don't dispense with the history of a roadway before the route photos but the history of Donner Pass is steeped within California lore and western migration.  The first recorded Wagon Crossing of Donner Pass was back in 1844.  The infamous Donner Party saga occurred in the winter of 1846-47 in which only 48 of the 87 party members survived.  Although the Donner Party incident is largely attributed to poor planning and ill conceived Hastings Cutoff it largely led to the infamous reputation of Donner Pass. The first true road over the Sierra Nevada Range via the Donner Pass was known as the Dutch Flat & Donner Lake Road.  The Dutch Flat & Donner Lake Wagon Road was completed by 1864 to assist with construction of the Central Pacific build the First Trans-Continental Railroad over Donner Pass.  The websit

California State Route 159 (former California State Route 11 and US Route 66)

California State Route 159 was a post 1964-Renumbering State Route which was designated over former segments of California State Route 11 and US Route 66.  As originally defined California State Route 159 began at Interstate 5/US Route 99 at the Golden State Freeway in Los Angeles.  California State Route 159 followed Figueroa Street, Colorado Boulevard and Linda Vista Avenue to the planned Foothill Freeway.  California State Route 159 was truncated during 1965 to existing solely on Linda Vista Avenue where it remained until being relinquished during 1989.  California State Route 159 was formally deleted from the State Highway System during 1992.   The history of California State Route 159 Prior to 1933 the Division of Highways was not actively involved in maintaining urban highways outside of occasional cooperative projects.  The responsibility for signage of US Routes in cities was thusly given to the Automobile Club of Southern California in the Southern California region.  This bei