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Bookstore

Whether it is a travel guide for our next trip, a book about old highways, historical interest or otherwise, our library of resources continues to grow!  Feel free to support our site by purchasing any of these books at our Amazon Bookstore below!

Travel Guides:





General Interest:




Highway Features:





National Parks:


Scenic Drives:




Children's Books:

Comments

TIm Ho said…
a) No books
b) no means to pass along any tips located
c) Here is a story for your inquisitiveness

Infrastructure & Environment
Underneath This 'Pop-Up Forest' Is an Abandoned Highway

Akron, Ohio, calls it the Innerbelt National Forest.

http://www.governing.com/topics/transportation-infrastructure/gov-akron-ohio-highway-forest.html?utm_term=Underneath%20This%20%27Pop-Up%20Forest%27%20Is%20an%20Abandoned%20Highway&utm_campaign=2%20Cop%20Convictions%20in%202%20Months%3A%20Is%20This%20a%20Tipping%20Point%20in%20Police%20Accountability&utm_content=email&utm_source=Act-On+Software&utm_medium=email
TIm Ho said…
I see that Adam isn't much on two way communication. Too bad. I would suggest contact with the putnam county florida historical society for similar minds. This coming month will be a presentation on
"The Bellamy Road and other early Putnam County routes"
In 1824 the first session of the 18th United States Congress appropriated $20,000 to develop a public road in the Territory of Florida between Pensacola and St. Augustine. It was to generally follow the pre-existing Spanish Mission Trail. The segment between St. Augustine and Tallahassee was contracted to John J. Bellamy (1776-1845), a wealthy Jefferson County planter. The road was completed in May, 1826 using Native American guides and Bellamy's slaves. Portions of the original road are still in use today and a part of the Bellamy Road forms the county line between Putnam and Clay counties.
Please join us on Saturday, November 16th, 2019 at 11:00 AM at the Bronson-Mulholland House, 100 Madison Street, Palatka for James Williams' presentation on the Bellamy Road and other early Putnam County roads.
Mr. Williams published his first non-fiction book, "Four Florida Roads" in the fall of 2018. The titled highways are Bellamy Road, the Tamiami Trail, U.S. 301, and I-95. Taken together, the roads form an eccentric backdrop on Florida history. His first novel, "The Pedestrians", a wry sci-fi thriller, was published in 2015. Both books are available on Amazon.com
James Williams was a writer and editor of The Lake Region Monitor, a Keystone Heights/Melrose weekly newspaper for nine years. In semi-retirement since 2014, he has stayed busy more recently with presentations on his latest book throughout north Florida. Mr. Williams was born in Gainesville, but spent his childhood in Hampton, Florida. Since then he has lived and published in Kansas, Massachusetts, New York, Shanghai, and the People's Republic of China. He currently resides in Gainesville but travels in Florida extensively.
Adam said…
I apologize but i did not receive notification of either comment. It is best to mail me directly with any comments and suggestions.

I'm honestly confused by the first two bullet points on your original comment. I've not had any complaints about books not being visible on this page. The second one I do not understand what you mean.

Finally as for the suggestions, I appreciate them and as time allows (it is difficult with two children (one with special needs) and full time jobs to stay on top of things like I did 10-15 years ago.

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