Skip to main content

Bookstore

Whether it is a travel guide for our next trip, a book about old highways, historical interest, or otherwise, our library of resources continues to grow!  Feel free to support our site by purchasing any of these books at our Amazon Bookstore below!

Travel Guides:





General Interest:
 

Highway Features:




National Parks:


Scenic Drives:




Children's Books:


Roadtrip Games:

Comments

TIm Ho said…
a) No books
b) no means to pass along any tips located
c) Here is a story for your inquisitiveness

Infrastructure & Environment
Underneath This 'Pop-Up Forest' Is an Abandoned Highway

Akron, Ohio, calls it the Innerbelt National Forest.

http://www.governing.com/topics/transportation-infrastructure/gov-akron-ohio-highway-forest.html?utm_term=Underneath%20This%20%27Pop-Up%20Forest%27%20Is%20an%20Abandoned%20Highway&utm_campaign=2%20Cop%20Convictions%20in%202%20Months%3A%20Is%20This%20a%20Tipping%20Point%20in%20Police%20Accountability&utm_content=email&utm_source=Act-On+Software&utm_medium=email
TIm Ho said…
I see that Adam isn't much on two way communication. Too bad. I would suggest contact with the putnam county florida historical society for similar minds. This coming month will be a presentation on
"The Bellamy Road and other early Putnam County routes"
In 1824 the first session of the 18th United States Congress appropriated $20,000 to develop a public road in the Territory of Florida between Pensacola and St. Augustine. It was to generally follow the pre-existing Spanish Mission Trail. The segment between St. Augustine and Tallahassee was contracted to John J. Bellamy (1776-1845), a wealthy Jefferson County planter. The road was completed in May, 1826 using Native American guides and Bellamy's slaves. Portions of the original road are still in use today and a part of the Bellamy Road forms the county line between Putnam and Clay counties.
Please join us on Saturday, November 16th, 2019 at 11:00 AM at the Bronson-Mulholland House, 100 Madison Street, Palatka for James Williams' presentation on the Bellamy Road and other early Putnam County roads.
Mr. Williams published his first non-fiction book, "Four Florida Roads" in the fall of 2018. The titled highways are Bellamy Road, the Tamiami Trail, U.S. 301, and I-95. Taken together, the roads form an eccentric backdrop on Florida history. His first novel, "The Pedestrians", a wry sci-fi thriller, was published in 2015. Both books are available on Amazon.com
James Williams was a writer and editor of The Lake Region Monitor, a Keystone Heights/Melrose weekly newspaper for nine years. In semi-retirement since 2014, he has stayed busy more recently with presentations on his latest book throughout north Florida. Mr. Williams was born in Gainesville, but spent his childhood in Hampton, Florida. Since then he has lived and published in Kansas, Massachusetts, New York, Shanghai, and the People's Republic of China. He currently resides in Gainesville but travels in Florida extensively.
Adam said…
I apologize but i did not receive notification of either comment. It is best to mail me directly with any comments and suggestions.

I'm honestly confused by the first two bullet points on your original comment. I've not had any complaints about books not being visible on this page. The second one I do not understand what you mean.

Finally as for the suggestions, I appreciate them and as time allows (it is difficult with two children (one with special needs) and full time jobs to stay on top of things like I did 10-15 years ago.

Popular posts from this blog

Sunshine Bridge (Donaldsonville, LA)

Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and New Orleans in southern Louisiana, the Sunshine Bridge spans the lower Mississippi River near the city of Donaldsonville as part of the longer Louisiana Highway 70 corridor, which connects Interstate 10 and Airline Highway (US 61) with US 90 in Morgan City. In the years following World War II, the only bridges across the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana were located in the area of the state’s two largest cities – Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Postwar agricultural and industrial development along the river in this region led to the planning of a series of infrastructure projects in southern Louisiana that were aimed at spurring this development and modernization of the Delta region. One of these projects was known as the Acadian Thruway and was developed in the 1950s as a toll road intended to connect greater New Orleans with Lafayette and points west while providing a high-speed bypass of the Baton Rouge metro area. The Thruway, which

Old River Lock & Control Structure (Lettsworth, LA)

  The Old River Control Structure (ORCS) and its connecting satellite facilities combine to form one of the most impressive flood control complexes in North America. Located along the west bank of the Mississippi River near the confluence with the Red River and Atchafalaya River nearby, this structure system was fundamentally made possible by the Flood Control Act of 1928 that was passed by the United States Congress in the aftermath of the Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927 however a second, less obvious motivation influenced the construction here. The Mississippi River’s channel has gradually elongated and meandered in the area over the centuries, creating new oxbows and sandbars that made navigation of the river challenging and time-consuming through the steamboat era of the 1800s. This treacherous area of the river known as “Turnbull’s Bend” was where the mouth of the Red River was located that the upriver end of the bend and the Atchafalaya River, then effectively an outflow

Huey P. Long Bridge (Baton Rouge, LA)

The decade of the 1930s brought unprecedented growth and development to Louisiana’s transportation infrastructure as the cities of New Orleans and Baton Rouge cemented their place as leading urban centers on the Gulf Coast. In the immediate aftermath of the success garnered by the construction of the massive bridge on the Mississippi River near New Orleans in 1935, planning and construction commenced on the state’s second bridge over the great river. This new bridge, located on the north side of Baton Rouge, was to be similar in design and form to its downriver predecessor. Completed in 1940 as the second bridge across the Mississippi River in Louisiana and the first to be built in the Baton Rouge area, this bridge is one of two bridges on the Mississippi named for Huey P. Long, a Louisiana politician who served as the 40th Governor of the State from 1928 to 1932, then as U.S. Senator from 1932 until his death by assassination at the state capitol in Baton Rouge on September 10, 1935