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Maui County Route 370

Maui County Route 370 is an approximately 11.8-mile highway which exists on the Island of Maui.  Maui County Route 370 is aligned from Hawaii Route 36/Hana Highway in Kahului and ends at Hawaii Route 37/Kula Highway near Pulehu.  From Kahului, Maui County Route 370 is aligned on approximately 0.1-miles of Hookele Street, 11.6-miles of Pulehu Road and 0.1-miles of Lower Kula Road.  Maui County Route 370 previously terminated in Kahului via a now razed portion of Pulehu Road which once connected directed to Hawaii Route 36/Hana Highway.


Part 1; the history of Maui County Route 370

The Island of Maui seemingly was not part of the original World War II era Hawaii Route System.  Circa 1955 the United States Bureau of Public Roads renumbered the Hawaii Route System.  The 1955 Hawaii Route Renumbering saw most of the conventions utilized by the current Hawaii State Route System established.  Primary Hawaii Routes were given two-digit numbers whereas Secondary Hawaii Routes were given three-digit numbers.  The Hawaii Routes were assigned in sequence for what Island/County they were located on coupled with what Federal Aid Program number they were tied to.  In the case of the Island of Maui it was assigned numbers in the range of 30-40.

Pulehu Road was not one of the original Hawaii Routes on Maui.  Pulehu Road between Kahului and Pulehu can be seen on the 1959 Gousha Map of Hawaii without a Hawaii Route designation.  

According to hawaiihighways.com Maui County Route 370 first appears on a 1976 Maui County planning map and then on a 1981 Maui County Route log.  The first United States Geological Survey Map to clearly display Maui County Route 370 is the 2013 edition for the Paia area.  Maui County Route 370 can be seen terminating at Hawaii Route 36/Hana Highway in Kahului directly via Pulehu Road.  

In recent years the direct connection between Hawaii Route 36/Hana Highway and Pulehu Road has served.  The connection to Maui County Route 370 has been replaced by Hookele Street.  The severing of the direct connection of Pulehu Road to Hawaii Route 36/Hana Highway was installed to make room for the construction of Phase 1 of Hawaii Route 3800 between Hawaii Route 311 east to Hawaii Route 36 during 2014.  

The severed segment of Pulehu Road at Hawaii Route 36/Hana Highway can be seen on Google Maps and 2019 era Google Street View image.    





Part 2; the reconfigured terminus of Maui County Route 370 in Kahului

Maui County Route 370 remains unsigned from Hawaii Route 36/Hana Highway approaching Hookele Street aside from the reference to Pulehu as a control destination.  


Traffic is on Hookele Street is directed onto Maui County Route 370 southbound via a left hand turn onto Pulehu Road.  Strangely the Pulehu Road placard is still displayed with orange construction color.  The sign at the intersection of Hookele Street and Pulehu Road appears to be the only reassurance shield on Maui County Route 370.  

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