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California State Route 11; the Otay Mesa Freeway Extension

The current iteration of California State Route 11 is a planned tolled freeway known as the Otay Mesa Freeway Extension.  The alignment of California State Route 11 is planned to originate from the Otay Mesa East Port of Entry and terminate to the west at California State Route 905/California State Route 125 interchange in San Diego.  In current form only a mile of California State Route 11 from Enrico Fermi Drive west to the California State Route 905/California State Route 125 interchange has been opened to traffic.  




Part 1; the history of modern California State Route 11

The current corridor of California State Route 11 ("CA 11") is second highway to use the number.  The original CA 11 corridor was found in the Los Angeles Area and was one of the original Sign State Routes announced during August 1934.  The original CA 11 featured numerous notable segments of highway such as the Arroyo Seco Parkway and Harbor Freeway.  The original CA 11 featured multiplexes with US Route 66, US Route 6 and US Route 99.  More regarding the original CA 11 can be found below:

The Arroyo Seco Parkway and the early terminus points of US Route 66 in Los Angeles

The current CA 11 was designated via 1994 Legislative Chapter 409.  Upon being designated during 1994 the current CA 11 was not given a specific route description.  CA 11 was intended to terminate a new Mexican Port of Entry where it would connect with an unconstructed Mexican Freeway then known as Tijuanna 2000.  CA 11 appears on the 2005 Caltrans Map with the following Legislative Description:


The generalized planned routing of CA 11 appears on the 2005 Caltrans Map.  


According to CAhighways.org during June 2012 the California Transportation Commission approved CA 11 for consideration of future funding after a finalized Environmental Impact Report was submitted.  During December 2012 the California Transportation Commission approved a route adoption of a new 2.8 mile tolled freeway from the CA 905/CA 125 interchange east to the proposed Otay Mesa East Port of Entry.  The initial segment of CA 11 east of CA 905/CA 125 to Enrico Fermi Drive opened to traffic on March 19th, 2016 according to Caltrans District 11.  

On July 7th, 2016 the San Diego Union Tribune announced that Caltrans and the San Diego Associations of Government ("SANDAG") had received $49.3 in Federal Funding for construction of CA 11.  The Federal Funding was earmarked to constructed southbound ramp connectors between CA 11, CA 125 and CA 905.  


During August 2019 the Los Angeles Tribune reported that construction of the second segment of CA 11 from Enrico Fermi Drive to the Otay Mesa East Port of Entry had begun and was expected to be complete during 2021.  Construction of the Otay Mesa East Port of Entry is stated to have a projected beginning in 2021 with a completion target of 2023.  

The San Diego Union Tribune reported during October 2024 that the Otay Mesa East Port of Entry was anticipated to be completed by 2024 due to COVID-19 pandemic related delays.  The second segment of CA 11 was stated in the article to have an anticipated completion to the Otay Mesa East Port of Entry sometime during late 2021.  During September of 2021 it was reported on the AAroads forum that the first Diverging Diamond Interchange in San Diego was opened at CA 11 and Enrico Fermi Drive.  As of the publishing date of this blog (12/2/21) the second segment of CA 11 has not yet opened. 


Part 2; Roadwaywiz features California State Route 11

During October 2020 Dan Murphy of the Roadwaywiz Youtube Channel (and Gribblenation) featured real-time drives on CA 11.  Below eastbound CA 11 from CA 905 on the Otay Mesa Freeway Extension to Enrico Fermi Drive can be observed.  


Below westbound CA 11 on the Otay Mesa Freeway Extension from Enrico Fermi Drive to CA 905 can be observed. 


CA 11 and the Otay Mesa Freeway Extension were featured on the Roadwaywiz San Diego area webinar on April 18th, 2020.  The panel (Dan Murphy, Tom Fearer and Scott Onson) discuss CA 11 and the Otay Mesa Freeway Extension at time stamp 51:28-55:56.

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