Skip to main content

Kenoza Stone Arch Bridge

In the 18th and 19th Centuries, stone arch bridges were a popular form of bridging creeks, streams and rivers. One of these bridges is a beautiful three arched stone bridge known as the Kenoza Stone Arch Bridge in Kenoza Lake, New York. This bridge can easily be seen from nearby NY Route 52, near the intersection of NY Route 52 and NY Route 52A. The stone arch bridge spanning over the East Branch of the Callicoon Creek was originally built in 1880 by Swiss immigrants Henry and Philip Hembt, who put their stone masonry skills to good use. The bridge had been built to replace a wooden bridge that collapsed from a load of hemlock being carried by wagon on its way to a nearby tannery. The bridge construction used temporary wood framework, also known as centering, to support the stones used in the arches during construction; so once all the stones were set, the forms were removed. The bridge was located near the Newburgh-Cochecton Turnpike and was important to the development of the area, along with the local agricultural, lumber (there was a nearby saw mill) and tanning industries. The bridge was used in regular service until 1945

The Kenoza Stone Arch Bridge has some tragedy attached to it as well. In January 1892, one of the few hex murders in the Upper Delaware Valley region of New York State occurred on the stone arch bridge. George Markert was murdered upon this bridge by Adam Heidt and his son Joseph Heidt while Markert was crossing the bridge at night. Adam Heidt was a farmer who believed that Markert was a warlock who had placed a hex upon him. This hex could be activated any time Markert did something three times, so it seems a little strange that the murder was done over the three arched bridge. Markert was beaten with a club by the Heidts, shot five times with a revolver, and then Markert was finally thrown into the frozen waters of the creek below. Joseph was sent to prison, but Adam was sent to a state mental hospital because the judge thought he was mentally ill. It is said that George Markert’s ghost still haunts the bridge even to this day.

Now a key part of the Stone Arch Bridge Historic Park, the bridge was restored in 1980 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The stone arch bridge is a serene work of art and is available for your quiet enjoyment, free of any hexes.





Sources and Links:
Sullivan Catskills - Stone Arch Bridge Historic Park
Sullivan County Historical Society - The Stone Arch Bridge
Haunted Places - Stone Arch Bridge
The River Reporter - Murder and Mayhem in the Catskills  

Crossposted to http://unlockingnewyork.blogspot.com/2018/02/kenoza-stone-arch-bridge.html

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Interstate 40 and the H-Bomb

Interstate 40 within California is entirely contained to San Bernandio County over a course of 155 miles from Interstate 15 in Barstow east to the Arizona State Line at the Colorado River.  Interstate 40 is aligned entirely in the Mojave Desert over the same general corridor established by US Route 66 and the National Old Trails Road.   Interstate 40 is known as the Needles Freeway and has an interesting backstory which included the prospect of the Bristol Mountains being excavated by way of nuclear blasts as part of Operation Carryall.   Part 1; the history of Interstate 40 in California The focus on this blog will be primarily centered around the construction of Interstate 40 ("I-40") within California.  That being said the corridor of automotive travel east of Barstow to the Arizona State Line was largely pioneered by the National Old Trails Road ("NOTR")   In April of 1912 the NOTR was organized with the goal of signing a trans-continental highway between Baltim

California State Route 232

This past month I drove the entirety of California State Route 232 in Ventura County. CA 232 is an approximately 4 miles State Highway aligned on Vineland Avenye which begins near Saticoy at CA 118 and traverses southwest to US Route 101 in Oxnard.  The alignment of CA 232 was first adopted into the State Highway System in 1933 as Legislative Route Number 154 according to CAhighways.org. CAhighways.org on LRN 154 As originally defined LRN 154 was aligned from LRN 9 (future CA 118) southwest to LRN 2/US 101 in El Rio.  This configuration of LRN 154 between CA 118/LRN 9 and US 101/LRN 2 can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Ventura County. 1935 Ventura County Highway Map According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 154 was extended west from US 101/LRN 2 to US 101A/LRN 60 in 1951.  Unfortunately State Highway Maps do not show this extension due to it being extremely small. During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 154 was assigned CA 232.  Of n

California State Route 128

California State Route 128 is a 121 mile State Highway which spans from California State Route 1 at the mouth Navarro River eastward to Interstate 505 near Winters.  California State Route 128 is one of California's most underrated scenic State Highways which traverses; Mendocino County, Solano County, Napa County and Yolo County.  Presently California State Route 128 has 11 unconstructed miles which would connect it from Interstate 505 east to California State Route 113 in Davis.   Part 1; the history of the original California State Route 28 and California State Route 128 What became California State Route 128 ("CA 128") was announced in the   August 1934 California Highways & Public Works  as the original CA 28.    CA 28 in it's original definition was aligned from CA 1 near Albion east to US 40 near Davis.   CA 28 as originally defined was comprised of numerous Legislative Route Numbers ("LRN") which were adopted as follows: -  LRN 1  between McDona