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Former alignments of GA 139 and 314 around Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport

When an airport expands, the growing facility usually takes a lot with it.  And in the case of the early 2000's runway expansion of Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, many changes were made to the highway system surrounding it.  Both Georgia Highways 139 and 314 have not been immune to the airport's expansion.  The first changes occurred in the early to mid 1970's.  That expansion of the airport led to a rerouting of GA 139 and a change to the terminus of GA 314.  The 1978 GDOT map (above right) shows the results of the 1970s expansion.
 
Nearly 30 years later, another runway expansion would alter the southern grounds of the airport.  Along with other surface streets, GA 139 and 314 were greatly impacted.  GA 139 now snakes its way through the airport grounds while GA 314 has been scaled back to end at GA 139 just inside the Perimeter (Interstate 285).  The changes to both routes and various surface streets have left interesting pockets of former alignments of the two state highways within the airport's grounds.  Back in 2004-2006, John Krakoff documented some of the surprises that were still left standing.

Former Northern Terminus of GA 314:
Looking North down former GA 314 at its prior northern terminus at what was once GA 139.  The fence to the right is the current limits of the runway expansion. (John Krakoff)


What was at one time the first GA 314 shield southbound.  As you can see, there's not much left of Highway 314.  Running just below the horizon in this photo is the realigned GA 139. (John Krakoff)
At the old northern terminus of GA 314, you are no longer able to take a right turn onto what once was GA 139 South. (John Krakoff)
A zoomed in shot of a leftover GA 139 South shield. (John Krakoff)


Leftover signage:
An archaic Stop Ahead warning sign (John Krakoff)
A set of leftover GA 314 shields. (John Krakoff)

An aging 'JCT' GA 314 shield found along a surface street. (John Krakoff)
Current Northern GA 314 Terminus:
A 'JCT' South GA 314 shield is found along GA 139 North. (John Krakoff)

The 'END' GA 314 assembly marking the new northern terminus of GA 314.  The expanded airport runway is located right behind the sign and fence. (John Krakoff)

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