Skip to main content

Throwback Thursday; Canyon de Chelly National Monument and Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site

Back in 2012 I visited Canyon de Chelly National Monument in the Navajo Nation in Apache County Arizona located just east of US Route 191.






Canyon de Chelly National Monument was created back in 1931 and consists of several interconnected canyons.  The Canyon lands of Canyon de Chelly National Monument have evidence of human habitation going back close to 4,000 years with various cliff dwellings as old as possible 350 AD.  Members of what is now the Hopi Tribe inhabited Canyon de Chelly until about 1,300 AD when they migrated to the west.  Canyon de Chelly is still inhabited by members of the Navajo Nation making the National Monument one of the oldest continually inhabited places in North America.


From US 191 to I took BIA 7 into Canyon de Chelly towards Spider Rock.  BIA 7 is actually a maintained roadway all the way west to the New Mexico State Line but apparently is poorly graded dirt east of the National Monument boundary.  From high above the canyon walls it is very obvious the floor of Canyon de Chelly is still inhabited.  The "White House" which is a large cliff dwelling was easily observed climbing to the Spider Rock Overlook.












The most notable feature of Canyon de Chelly is the Spider Rock which is a 750 sandstone spire jutting up from the canyon floor.  Navajo tribal tradition holds that the Spider Rock is home to the Spider Woman who created the Navajo.


On my way back south from Canyon de Chelly National Monument I stopped in Ganado on US 191/AZ 264 to see the Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site.


The Hubbell Trading Post was established by John Lorenzo Hubbell in 1878 which was ten years after the Navajo were allowed to return to the Ganado area.  The Hubbell Trading Post essentially was the only outlet for Navajo to receive goods from the outside world in the late 19th century.  The National Park Service purchased the Hubbell Trading Post in 1967 although it was a National Historic Site by 1965.





Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Bayshore Freeway (US Route 101)

The Bayshore Freeway is a 56.4-mile component of US Route 101 located in the San Francisco Bay Area.  The Bayshore Freeway connects the southern extent of San Jose to the Central Freeway in the city of San Francisco.  The corridor was originally developed as the Bayshore Highway between 1923 and 1937.  The Bayshore Highway would serve briefly as mainline US Route 101 before being reassigned as US Route 101 Bypass in 1938.  Conceptually the designs for the Bayshore Freeway originated in 1940 but construction would be delayed until 1947.  The Bayshore Freeway was completed by 1962 and became mainline US Route 101 during June 1963.   Part 1; the history of the Bayshore Freeway Prior the creation of the Bayshore Highway corridor the most commonly used highway between San Jose and San Francisco was El Camino Real (alternatively known as Peninsula Highway).  The  American El Camino Real  began as an early example of a signed as an Auto Trail starting in 1906.  The era of State Highway Mainte

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 41 through Paso Robles

Paso Robles is a city located on the Salinas River of San Luis Obispo County, California.  As originally configured the surface alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 converged in downtown Paso Robles.  US Route 101 originally was aligned through Paso Robles via Spring Street.  California State Route 41 entered the City of Paso Robles via Union Road and 13th Street where it intersected US Route 101 at Spring Street.  US Route 101 and California State Route 41 departed Paso Robles southbound via a multiplex which split near Templeton.   Pictured above is the cover of the September/October 1957 California Highways & Public Works which features construction of the Paso Robles Bypass.  Pictured below is the 1935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County which depicts US Route 101 and California State Route 41 intersecting in downtown Paso Robles.   Part 1; the history of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 in Paso Robles Paso Robles ("Pass of the

Paper Highways; US Route 20 Alternate over Teton Pass

The 8,431-foot-high Teton Pass lies in the Teton Range of the Rocky Mountains within Teton County, Wyoming.  Presently Teton Pass is crossed by Wyoming Highway 22 and Idaho State Highway 33.  At one point the highway over Teton Pass was signed as US Route 20 Alternate.  US Route 20 Alternate was over Teton Pass never formally approved by the American Association of State Highway Officials nor has the corridor ever been officially part of a US Route.  The image above was taken from the 1949 Rand McNally Map of Idaho, Wyoming and Montana which shows US Route 20 Alternate branching from US Route 20/US Route 191 near Sugar City, Idaho and crossing Teton Pass towards Jackson, Wyoming.   Part 1; the history of US Route 20 Alternate over Teton Pass No major Auto Trail was ever assigned to Teton Pass as evidenced by the 1925 Rand McNally Map of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming .  On the Wyoming side Teton Pass can be seen as part of Wyoming Highway 25 ("WY 25") whereas no State Highway is