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Picture Perfect Schoharie County, New York (Part 1)

There was once a local tourism ad for Schoharie County, New York that went something like this: So much to see and so much to do. It's family fun and educational too. In picture perfect Schoharie County.

My own history with Schoharie County is deep one. My father bought property in the county during the 1970s and built a hunting cabin. Unfortunately, my father has since passed away, but we still have the land and cabin in my family. While I was growing up during the 1980s and 1990s, my family and I would often make trips from my native Long Island to the cabin. Over the years, I've become intimately familiar with the lay of the land and the country roads that traverse the landscape of the county, from the northern edge of the Catskills to the scenic Schoharie Valley and on to the rolling hills that descend into the Mohawk Valley along the northern border of Schoharie County. I live in the Albany, New York area these days, so heading to Schoharie County for a weekend or even just for a leisurely afternoon drive is always an option. There is a lot to see and my experiences have been fun, pleasant and even educational. It's the perfect Gribblenation getaway.

In this first part of a series, let's see some of the roads that crisscross Schoharie County, counting from 1 to 990V...


Schoharie County Route 1, or Mineral Springs Road. Schoharie CR 1 forms a scenic, southerly bypass of Cobleskill, the county's most populous community.

From Schoharie CR 1, you can get a view of the campus of SUNY Cobleskill, an agriculture and technology college.



Schoharie CR 1A connects NY 145 to the Village of Schoharie to the east. It was apparently apple season when I took this photo.
Truss bridge over the Schoharie Creek on Schoharie CR 1A in Schoharie. The Schoharie Creek has its source in the Catskills and flows northward to the Mohawk River.
Schoharie CR 1B goes from the Village of Schoharie east to the Albany County border. Plenty of rolling hills and farms dot the landscape along this road.
Schoharie CR 2 (North Road) runs from NY 30 in North Blenheim to NY 10 in Jefferson. When I was growing up, my family would call this road "the roller coaster road", as the road tends to follow the dips and high points of the surrounding landscape.


Schoharie CR 2 passes through the woods and the hollows, but also passes by some farms as well, including this dairy farm just outside of Jefferson.

Whatcha lookin' at, pal?
Schoharie CR 2A runs from Jefferson west to the Delaware County line near Harpersfield, where it continues as Delaware CR 29 on its way to NY 23.
Schoharie CR 3 (Potter Mountain Road) traverses east and west in the southeastern part of the county, from the Albany County line near Potter Hollow to NY 990V in Conesville.

Schoharie CR 3 follows the routing of the former Susquehanna Turnpike, also known as the Catskill Turnpike. The Susquehanna Turnpike was incorporated in 1800 and went from Catskill, through Greene, Schoharie and Delaware Counties to the Susquehanna River in Unadilla.
I just liked how this early morning photo of Schoharie CR 3 looks.
Church on Schoharie CR 4 in West Fulton.
Schoharie CR 4 is one of the longest county routes in Schoharie County, connecting NY 7 and NY 10 in Warnerville with NY 30 in the Town of Fulton.

It has abundant scenic views.

And a bevy of signs.

Schoharie CR 4 descending the hills on its way to Warnerville.
Old Sharon town line sign on Schoharie CR 5. I'm not sure if this sign is still in the wild.

Views of the rolling hills as seen from Schoharie CR 5, which is in the northwestern quarter of the county.
Schoharie CR 5A and Schoharie CR 5B in the small community of Argusville.
Schoharie CR 6 (Charlotte Valley Road) descends from NY 10 in Summit and down into the Charlotte Valley and the Susquehanna River watershed. Its sweeping curves take you into what I think is one of the most scenic drives in Schoharie County, especially if you're driving westbound. Schoharie CR 6 is also a great alternative to I-88 and NY 7 if you are heading to Otsego County, Delaware County or Oneonta.
Charlotteville, New York, a small hamlet you'll encounter while driving along Schoharie CR 6. I've been through here a lot, even buying snacks at the Charlotteville General Store from an early age. While working on this article, I found that over the past couple of decades, I had taken over 1000 photos from various places along the almost 8 mile stretch of Schoharie CR 6.

Some early morning fog near Schoharie CR 6 makes for a nice scene.
Enjoying a nice spring day on Schoharie CR 7A, a short county route between US 20 near Carlisle and neighboring Montgomery County.
Schoharie CR 8 runs from Cobleskill and winds up ending somewhere not far from Howe Caverns.

Bramanville.
Schoharie CR 8 is both up and down.
Schoharie CR 9 passes both Howe Caverns and nearby Secret Caverns. But it also passes by this stone town boundary marker at the border of the Towns of Carlisle, Cobleskill and Esperance.
The sun is setting on my drive down Schoharie CR 9.
Schoharie CR 10 (Grovernors Corners Road) is a scenic county route between the outskirts of Cobleskill and NY 30A in Central Bridge.
Schoharie CR 10 whips its way through the hills.
Schoharie CR 12 (Blenheim Hill Road) mostly traverses through forests, but I like this view of a farm alongside the road.
Schoharie CR 13 once was a continuous route. However, flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Irene in August 2011 changed that, as the ravaging floods on the Schoharie Creek washed away a section of roadway in Gilboa.

Otherwise, Schoharie CR 13 is a fairly pedestrian highway that meanders through farms and forests between NY 10 and NY 990V.

Farm along Schoharie CR 13.

Schoharie CR 13 shield at NY 30.
The southern end of Schoharie CR 16 (Wharton Hollow Road) at Schoharie CR 43 (West Kill Road) near Jefferson.
Schoharie CR 17 is the longest county route in the county. Plenty of rolling hills, but there is a nice view of the northern Catskills along one stretch of the road.

It's a nice view in both summer and fall.
Schoharie CR 19, the curiously named Stone Store Road, is a fun road to drive up from NY 145. Plenty of switchbacks and uphill climbing.

I encountered a pleasant autumn day once I reached the top of Schoharie CR 19.
Schoharie CR 20 (Sawyer Hollow Road) traverses the farmland and hills between Summit and West Fulton. In Summit, there is a small lake along Schoharie CR 20 called Summit Lake. I've been known to take a kayak out on the lake or go for a quick swim.

Schoharie CR 20 as it passes by a farm or two.

Schoharie CR 20 also passes by a few state forests, including Mallet Pond State Forest.

Sources and Links:
Schoharie County - New York Routes
Continue on to Picture Perfect Schoharie County (Part 2)

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