Skip to main content

Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway and Red Hill Valley Parkway

This past April I drove the entirety of Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway and Red Hill Valley Parkway in the City of Hamilton between King's Highway 403 east to Queen Elizabeth Way.


Lincoln M. Alexander Park ("LMAP") and Red Hill Valley Parkway ("RHVP") serve as a southern bypass of downtown Hamilton.  Both LMAP and RHVP are locally maintained by the City of Hamilton which is something of an oddity for freeways in general.  The route of LMAP is 12.5 Kilometers/7.8 Miles long whereas RHVP is 6 Kilometers/4 Miles long.  LMAP was planned in the early 1960s but was ultimately built in phases between 1991 to 1997.  RHVP dates back even further with plans to construct it dating back to 1956.  RHVP was opened in phases; first in 2007 and in 2017.

My approach to LMAP was from KH 403 east.



LMAP is signed at a very slow 90KMPH, the first exit eastbound is at Golf Links Road/Mohawk Road.  Exits on LMAP are not assigned numbers.


LMAP includes a couple unique shields which include direction of travel and are seen generally at the end of on-ramps.


There is copious amounts of speeding fine signage on LMAP eastbound.


The next exit on LMAP east is at Garth Street.


Following Garth Street the next Exit on LMAP east is Upper James Street. 


East of Upper James Street the next Exit on LMAP is located at Upper Wentworth Street.


The next Exit on LMAP eastbound is located at Upper Gage Avenue. 


Just prior to the Exit at Dartnall Road the LMAP ends and RHVP begins.  RHVP has unique shield signage much like LMAP. 




RHVP has an Exit with Upper Red Hill Valley Parkway (seriously wouldn't have been easier just to assign a route number as a single freeway?) Mud Street and the route begins to curve north. 



RHVP begins to snake downhill and the speed limit falls to 80KMPH at the Greenhill Exit. 




The next Exit on RHVP is at King Street. 


The next two Exits on RHVP are located at Queenston Road and Barton Street. 



RHVP terminates at Queen Elizabeth Way.  I turned east on Queen Elizabeth Way towards the New York State Line. 



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Signed County Route J37; the last Signed Tulare County Route and the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road

Recently I drove the entirety of Signed County Route J37 located in rural Tulare County.  Signed County Route J37 is notable in that it is the last Signed County Route which actually has field signage left in Tulare County and was intended to be part of a Trans-Sierra Highway known as the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road.


While researching California State Route 190 and more specifically the gap in the highway over the Sierra Nevada Range it became quickly apparent that there was far more to J37/Balch Park Road than initially thought.  The previous blog on California State Route 190 can be found here:

California State Route 190; the Trans-Sierra Highway that could have been 

On the above blog I attached an article from 1926 written by the Los Angeles Times detailing the route of the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road which was slated to begin construction in 1927.  The route of the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road would have followed Carroll Creek southward out…

Paper Highways of the Mojave Desert and San Gabriel Mountains; CA 48 (ii), CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249

In this edition Paper Highways the planned California State Highways of the Mojave Desert and San Gabriel Mountains are explored.  This issue will cover the planned routes of; the second CA 48, CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249.



Part 1; the wholesale Legislative Route adoptions of 1959

CA 48, CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249 prior to the 1964 State Highway Renumbering all were adopted as planned Legislative Routes ("LRN") in 1959.  Part of the planned LRN 267 west of Lancaster was already part of the existing CA 138 on LRN 59.  CA 48 east of Lancaster was planned as LRN 267 which was to have an eastern terminus at LRN 266.  LRN 266 was planned to originate from CA 2/LRN 61 near La Canada Flintridge and cross north/northeast over the San Gabriel Mountains into the Mojave Desert near Palmdale.  LRN 266 was planned to continue northeast from Palmdale to former US 466/LRN 48 near Hawes.  LRN 266 became CA 249 and CA 122 during the 1964 State Highway Renumbering.  LRN 269 was planned to be rou…

Old California State Route 65 on; Famoso-Porterville Highway, Sign County Routes J35/J22/J29

Earlier in March I traveled down to Famoso of Kern County to take the original alignment of California State Route 65 north to Lindsay in Tulare County.


This blog is a spin off of the below entry on the Southern Segment of current California State Route 65.

California State Route 65; South Segment

Part 1; The Stockton-Los Angeles Road, the East Side Line, and early California State Route 65 on Legislative Route 129

The corridor of CA 65 is closely aligned to the Sierra Nevada Foothills which first became a popular route of travel as part of the Stockton-Los Angeles Road.  The Stockton-Los Angeles Road came into use after the 1853 Kern River Gold Rush began.  The Stockton-Los Angeles Road was a replacement of the earlier El Camino Viejo.  Unlike El Camino Viejo the Stockton-Los Angeles Road avoided the dense Tule Marshes in San Joaquin Valley.  The Stockton-Los Angles Road stayed close to the Sierra Foothills near the new claims on the Kern River watershed.  The earlier El Camino Vi…