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California State Route 282

This past month I traveled on the tiny California State Route 282 located in the City of Coronado in San Diego County.


CA 282 is a 0.6 mile State Highway which is signed in dual one-way on configurations along 3rd Street (westbound) and 4th Street (eastbound) in the City of Coronado.  The east terminus of CA 282 is at CA 75/Orange Avenue whereas the west terminus is at Alameda Boulevard in front of the Main Gate of Naval Station North Island.  CA 282 serves primarily as a connector route to Naval Air Station North Island carrying approximately 20,000 vehicles to/from the Coronado Bridge on CA 75 daily.

The history of CA 282 is brief but somewhat interesting regarding the alignment history of the highway.  CA 282 was designated by the State Legislature in 1967 according to CAhighways.org.  At the time it was commissioned CA 282 was defined as running entirely on 4th Street between Alameda Boulevard and CA 75 on Orange Avenue.  In 1968 the definition of CA 282 was extended north on Orange Avenue to the San Diego-Coronado Ferry.  The route extension of CA 282 to the San Diego-Coronado Ferry was written with a provision that it would be deleted upon the opening of San Diego-Coronado Toll Bridge.

CAhighways.org on CA 282

Ultimately CA 282 never made an appearance on a State Highway Map before 1970.  The Coronado Bridge opened in mid-year 1969 which truncated the route entirely to 4th Street.

1970 State Highway Map City Insert

By 1972 the alignment of CA 282 was moved onto the present dual one-way configuration on 3rd Street and 4th Street.

In recent years the traffic on both CA 75 and CA 282 has become an increasing concern.  In 2009 Caltrans published a study showing three alternatives for a new alignment of CA 282; one involved an underpass of Orange Avenue and the other two involve tunneling.

SR-75 Transportation Concept Summary

Caltrans in the last couple years has expressed interest in relinquishing CA 75 and CA 282 in Coronado to the city.  Apparently Caltrans has even offer up to $17,000,000 million to the City of Coronado to repair CA 75/CA 282.  It really isn't clear at this time if CA 282 and CA 75 might be relinquished in Coronado any time soon.

2019 Coronado New article regarding highway relinquishment in Coronado

As it stands presently westbound CA 75 begins at 3rd Street at CA 75/Orange Avenue.  CA 282 westbound is well signed directing traffic to Naval Air Station North Island.



CA 282 westbound follows three lanes of one-way traffic to the Main Gate of Naval Air Station Island at Alameda Boulevard.  Traffic headed to eastbound CA 282 is directed to take Alameda Boulevard to 4th Street. 






CA 282 eastbound begins at Alameda Boulevard on one-way 4th Street and terminates at CA 75 at Orange Avenue.  CA 282 eastbound is not well signed and doesn't have any end-route signage at CA 75 but the path to the Coronado Bridge is very apparent. 






CA 282 as mentioned above briefly was aligned north on Orange Avenue to the San Diego-Coronado.  Before the Coronado Bridge was built the San Diego-Coronado Ferry was located at Orange Avenue and 1st Avenue in what is now Centennial Park.  The San Diego-Coronado Ferry landed in what is now Embarcadero Marina Park North and connected directly to US 101 when it was aligned on Pacific Highway/Harbor Drive.  This view blow is on northbound CA 75 on Orange Avenue at the corner of 4th Street looking north where CA 282 headed towards the San Diego-Coronado Ferry. 


Centennial Park was built over the previous location of the San Diego-Coronado Ferry and is the north terminus of the Bayshore Bikeway.  Suffice to say the views of downtown San Diego are worth stopping to see. 





Coronado is presently served by a foot ferry located east of Centennial Park at the Coronado Ferry Landing.


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