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Blue Water Bridge; east terminus of Interstate 94 and north terminus of Interstate 69

While in the Mid-West this year I crossed the Canadian Border into Ontario via the common terminus of Interstate 69 and Interstate 94 at the Blue Water Bridge over the St. Clair River.


The Blue Water Bridge is a dual structure facility which connects I-69/I-94 in Port Huron, Michigan to King's Highway 402 in Sarnia, Ontario.  The first Blue Water Bridge is a 6,178 foot long cantilever truss design which opened in 1938 and present serves westbound traffic.  The second Blue Water Bridge opened is a 6,109 bowstring arch structure which opened in 1997 serving eastbound traffic.  The Blue Water Bridge is operated by the Michigan Department of Transportation and Canadian based Federal Bridge Corporation.

When the Blue Water Bridge opened initially in 1938 it was served via US 25 by proxy from Pine Grove Avenue in Port Huron.  On the Canadian side the initial highway serving the Blue Water Bridge was King's Highway 40.  In 1953 a newly constructed limited access road known as KH 402 was built from the Blue Water Bridge to KH 40 and KH 7.  This 1956 Michigan State Highway Map shows the routes present around the Blue Water Bridge before the American Interstate system was complete

1956 Michigan State Highway Map 

By 1964 I-94 had been completed to Port Huron and was the first Interstate to use the structure.  In 1982 KH 402 was connected to KH 401 in Central Ontario which increased traffic volumes.  I-69 was completed to Port Huron and the Blue Water Bridge in 1984.  Since 1984 both I-94 and I-69 have had a common terminus point at the Blue Water Bridge.

My approach to the Blue Water Bridge was on I-94 east.  I-94 merges onto I-69 north in Port Huron at Exit 271.


The multiplex of I-69/I-94 is very well signed.  Traffic on I-69 north/I-94 east is quickly advised the last American access point is at M-25 via Exit 27t.  M-25 is part of what was US 25 which was truncated in 1974.






Signage indicates that I-69/I-94 ends before the Blue Water Bridge.  Toll rates from the American side for the Blue Water Bride is $3 dollars American and $4 dollars Canadian.




Traffic on the eastbound span of the Blue Water Bridge has three lanes.  Immediately east of the center span of the eastbound Blue Water Bridge signage welcoming drivers to Canada is present.  Beyond the customs checkpoint on the Canadian side of the Blue Water Bridge is the beginning of KH 402.











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