Skip to main content

Interstate 215/former Interstate-15 East and California State Route 194

This past year I drove the entirety of Interstate 215 in San Bernardino County and Riverside County.


I-215 is a 54 mile loop of I-15 beginning near Cajon Pass in San Bernardino County and ending to the south in Murrieta of Riverside County.  I-215 essentially serves as a limited access replacement of US 66/91/395 on Legislative Route Number 31 south towards I-10.  South of I-10 the route of I-215 follows what was US 91/395 on LRN 43 to US 60/LRN 19.  I-215 shares a brief multiplex of CA 60 near Riverside and what was US 60/395 on LRN 19 to what was US 395/LRN 78 towards Murrieta.


According to CAhighways.org I-215 was first approved as a Non-Chargeable Interstate south to I-10 as I-215 in 1972.  The route designation was swapped to I-15 East by 1973 with an additional portions of Non-Chargeable roadway added south to CA 60.  By 1982 the designation of I-15 East was reverted back to I-215.

CAhighways.org on I-215

The 1975 State Highway Map shows I-15E co-signed with US 395 (I guess that kicks the whole date of truncation to Hesperia even further into the 1970s) from Cajon Pass towards Sunnymead in modern day Moreno Valley. 


Of note, the map above shows the unsigned CA 194 aligned over all of what would become I-15E.  The designation of CA 194 (which was the second time this number was designated) was defined in 1974 and used as a hidden route number since suffixed highways are not allowed legislatively in California.  The hidden CA 194 designation of I-15E would disappear when the route was reverted back to I-215 in 1982.

CAhighways.org on CA 194

The 1977 State Highway Map shows US 395 removed completely from I-15E/CA 194.  I-15E appears to have been completed signed on it's entire route by 1977 but clearly was using some temporary alignments south of Sun City (modern Menifee).  According to CAhighways.org I-215 wouldn't be completed to modern Interstate standards until 1996.



I-15E can be seen changed to I-215 by the 1986 State Highway Map, the 1982 Edition still shows the previous designation.  Of interest the non-Interstate standard portions of 215 south of CA 60 are shown as CA 215 on the 1986 map.

1982 State Highway Map City Insert



1986 State Highway Map City Insert



My approach to I-215 south was from I-15 south descending from Cajon Pass.



I-215 south quickly enters San Bernardino and closely follows from US 66/91/395 east of Cajon Boulevard.


On I-215 south approaching CA 210 traffic headed to CA 18 and CA 330 are directed to exit eastbound.



As I-215 south approaches the interchange with CA 210 there are three exits.  CA 210 East traffic is directed onto Exit 46C whereas westbound traffic is directed to Exit 46A.  Traffic headed to Mount Vernon Avenue and 27th Street is directed to take Exit 46B.




I-215 south Exit 45 accesses Base Line Street.




I-215 south Exit 44 accesses CA 66 which is the former route of US 66.



I-215 south Exit 43 accesses 3rd Street and 2nd Street.



I-215 south Exit 42B accesses Mill Street whereas Exit 42A accesses Island Center Drive.




I-215 south Exit 41 accesses Orange Show Road and Auto Plaza Drive.


I-215 south junctions I-10 in the southern City Limits of San Bernardino and crosses the Santa Ana River into Colton.






I-215 Exit 39 accesses Mount Vernon Avenue and Washington Street.



I-215 south enters Grand Terrace and accesses Barton Road via Exit 38.



I-215 south Exit 37 accesses Iowa Avenue.




I-215 south enters Riverside County and has access to Center Street at Exit 36 in Highgrove.



I-215 south enters the City of Riverside.  At Exit 35 I-215 has access to Columbia Avenue, Exit 34C accesses CA 60 west and Exit 34B accesses CA 91 south.   I-215 south crosses through the CA 60/CA 91 junction and begins a multiplex of CA 60 east.









I-215 south/CA 60 east Exit 33 accesses Blaine Street and 3rd Street.


I-215 south/CA 60 east Exit 32B accesses University Avenue whereas Exit 32A accesses Martin Luther King Boulevard.





I-215 south/CA 60 east Exit 30A accesses Fair Isle Drive whereas Exit 30B accesses Central Avenue and Watkins Drive.







I-215 south splits from CA 60 east in Riverside.






I-215 south enters Moreno Valley.  At Exit 28 accesses Eastridge Avenue and Eucalyptus Avenue.








I-215 south of Exit 28 is signed as 25 miles from I-15.


I-215 south Exit 27B is signed as access Cactus Avenue whereas Exit 27A accesses March Air Reserve.




At I-215 Exit 25 March Field Museum is accessible via Van Buren Boulevard. 




I-215 south enters Perris and accesses Harley Knox Boulevard at Exit 23.




I-215 south Exit 22 accesses Ramona Expressway and Cajalco Expressway.


I-215 south Exit 19 accesses Nuevo Road.



I-215 Exit 18 accesses Perris and Lake Elsinore via D Street.



I-215 south meets CA 74 via Exit 17 at 4th Street.




I-215 south picks up CA 74 east on a multiplex.


I-215 south/CA 74 east enters Menifee.  At Exit 15 CA 74 east splits towards Hemet from I-215 south.




I-215 south Exit 14 accesses Ethanac Road.


I-215 south Exit 12 accesses the Sun City neighborhood of Menifee via McCall Boulevard.




I-215 south Exit 10 accesses Newport Road.




I-215 south enters Murrieta and accesses Scott Road at Exit 7.



I-215 Exit 4 accesses Clinton Keith Road.




I-215 south Exit 2 accesses Los Alamos Road.





I-215 south Exit 1 is signed as access for I-15 northbound via Murrieta Hot Springs Road.




I-215 southbound merges into I-15 southbound and oddly doesn't include any junction signage at the terminus.








Comments

Unknown said…
Yep, I remember when I was young it was I-15/US-395 to I-10 and then US-395 to the CA-91 interchange where it met with CA-60 and then continued south as US-395. Then it changed to I-15-E and then to I-215 for the freeway part and TEMP I-15-E and then CA-215 for the expressway part. It was confusing for this emerging road geek.

Popular posts from this blog

The Dummy Lights of New York

  A relic of the early days of motoring, dummy lights were traffic lights  that  were  placed  in the middle of a street intersection. In those early days, traffic shuffled through busy intersections with the help of a police officer who stood on top of a pedestal. As technology improved and electric traffic signals became commonplace, they were also  originally  positioned on a platform at the center of the intersection. Those traffic signals became known as  " dummy lights "  and were common until  traffic lights were moved  onto wires and poles that crossed above the intersection.  In New York State, only a handful of these dummy lights exist. The dummy lights  are found  in the Hudson Valley towns of Beacon and Croton-on-Hudson, plus there is an ongoing tug of war in Canajoharie in the Mohawk Valley, where their dummy light has been knocked down and replaced a few times. The dummy light in Canajoharie is currently out of commission, but popular demand has caused the dummy

Colorado Road (Fresno County)

Colorado Road is a rural highway located in San Joaquin Valley of western Fresno County.  Colorado Road services the city of San Joaquin in addition the unincorporated communities of Helm and Tranquility.  Colorado Road was constructed between 1910 and 1912 as a frontage road of the Hanford & Summit Lake Railway.  The roadway begins at California State Route 145 near Helm and terminates to the west at James Road in Tranquility.   Part 1; the history of Colorado Road Colorado Road was constructed as frontage road connecting the sidings of the Hanford & Summit Lake Railway.  The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway spanned from South Pacific Railroad West Side Line at Ingle junction southeast to the Coalinga Branch at Armona.  The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway broke ground during August 1910 and was complete by April 1912. The Hanford & Summit Lake Railway established numerous new sidings.  From Ingle the sidings of the line were Tranquility, Graham, San Joaquin, Caldwell, H

Madera County Road 400 and the 1882-1886 Yosemite Stage Road

Madera County Road 400 is an approximately twenty-four-mile roadway following the course of the Fresno River in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.  Road 400 begins at California State Route 145 near Madera and terminates to the north at Road 415 near Coarsegold.  Traditionally Road 400 was known as "River Road" prior to Madera County dropping naming conventions on county highways.  Road 400 was part of the original Yosemite Stage Route by the Washburn Brothers which began in 1882.  The Yosemite Stage Route would be realigned to the west in 1886 along what is now Road 600 to a rail terminus in Raymond.  Parts of Road 400 were realigned in 1974 to make way for the Hensley Lake Reservoir.  Part 1; the history of Madera County Road 400 Road 400 is historically tied to the Wawona Road and Hotel.  The Wawona Hotel is located near the Mariposa Grove in the modern southern extent of Yosemite National Park.   The origins of the Wawona Road are tied to the Wawona Hotel but it does predate th