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California State Route 84 over the Santa Cruz Mountains from I-280 west to CA 1

On a recent trip in the Bay Area I drove California State Route 84 over the Santa Cruz Mountains from Interstate 280 west to CA 1.


CA 84 between I-280 west to CA 1 lies entirely within San Mateo County.  The route of CA 84 over the Santa Cruz Mountains was originally defined as part of Legislative Route Number 107 in 1933 which only west to LRN 55 (modern CA 35) at Skyline Boulevard. 

CAhighways.org on LRN 107

Interestingly the original alignment of LRN 107 west of Woodside doesn't appear to be State Maintained as of 1935.  The California Division of Highways Map from San Mateo County in 1935 shows La Honda Road west of Woodside to LRN 55 as a County Maintained. 

1935 San Mateo County Map

LRN 107 first appears west of Woodside on La Honda Road to LRN 55 on the 1936-37 State Highway Map.

1936-1937 State Highway Map 

In 1959 the definition of LRN 107 was extended west from CA 5/LRN 55 to CA 1/LRN 56 near San Gregorio.  This new extension of LRN 107 first appears appears on the 1960 State Highway Map.

1960 State Highway Map

According to CAhighways.org the route of CA 84 was applied over LRN 107 in 1961.

CAhighways.org on CA 84

CA 84 first appears on the 1962 State Highway Map signed over the entirety of LRN 107 and LRN 108.

1962 State Highway Map

My approach to CA 84 west over the Santa Cruz Mountains was from I-280 south.  From Exit 25 on I-280 south on pulled onto CA 84 west on Woodside Road.




CA 84 west follows Woodside Road through Woodside.  Woodside dates back to 1849 and is mostly known for it's lumber days when Redwood Sequoias were milled in the area.



Traffic on CA 84 west in Woodside that trucks over 30 feet in length are not recommended.


One of the few reassurance shields on CA 84 west in the Santa Cruz Mountains appears in Woodside past Canada Road.



West of Woodside CA 84 follows Woodside Road through the heavily wooden Bear Gulch.







CA 84 west makes a turn onto La Honda Road.



CA 84 west makes an ascent to the crest of the Santa Cruz Mountains on La Honda Road.  La Honda Road is very curvy and was being overwhelmed by water flowing down out of the Santa Cruz Mountains.
















CA 84 west meets CA 35 on Skyline Boulevard at the ridge of the Santa Cruz Mountains.  Unfortunately someone had stolen all the CA 35 shields at pretty much every junction on Skyline Boulevard.



CA 84 west of CA 35 on La Honda Road follows La Honda Creek and begins to descend from the crest of the Santa Cruz Mountains.







CA 84 west meets Old La Honda Road on it's descent through the Santa Cruz Mountains.


Old La Honda Road is a single-lane old logging road that features steep grades and sharp drop-offs.

Old La Honda Road

CA 84 west on La Honda Road continues to follow La Honda Creek to community of the same name.  La Honda dates back to the 1860s and much like Woodside was center around lumber mills.









West of La Honda CA 84 picks up San Gregorio Creek.


CA 84 west follows San Gregorio Creek into an ever widening expanse of lush canyons approaching San Gregorio.










At the intersection of Stage Road CA 84 west enters San Gregorio.


San Gregorio dates back to the 1850s and still has an appearance of an early Gold Rush Era community.  The San Gregorio General Store has been in operation since been operation since 1889.


Stage Road is a very early alignment of CA 1 and appears on the 1935 San Mateo County Division of Highways Map above.



CA 84 west terminates at CA 1 at San Gregorio State Beach.  While the end of CA 84 doesn't have much fanfare the view from the cliffs above San Gregorio State Beach are worth making the trip across the Santa Cruz Mountains to see.




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