Skip to main content

California State Route 84 over the Santa Cruz Mountains from I-280 west to CA 1

On a recent trip in the Bay Area I drove California State Route 84 over the Santa Cruz Mountains from Interstate 280 west to CA 1.


CA 84 between I-280 west to CA 1 lies entirely within San Mateo County.  The route of CA 84 over the Santa Cruz Mountains was originally defined as part of Legislative Route Number 107 in 1933 which only west to LRN 55 (modern CA 35) at Skyline Boulevard. 

CAhighways.org on LRN 107

Interestingly the original alignment of LRN 107 west of Woodside doesn't appear to be State Maintained as of 1935.  The California Division of Highways Map from San Mateo County in 1935 shows La Honda Road west of Woodside to LRN 55 as a County Maintained. 

1935 San Mateo County Map

LRN 107 first appears west of Woodside on La Honda Road to LRN 55 on the 1936-37 State Highway Map.

1936-1937 State Highway Map 

In 1959 the definition of LRN 107 was extended west from CA 5/LRN 55 to CA 1/LRN 56 near San Gregorio.  This new extension of LRN 107 first appears appears on the 1960 State Highway Map.

1960 State Highway Map

According to CAhighways.org the route of CA 84 was applied over LRN 107 in 1961.

CAhighways.org on CA 84

CA 84 first appears on the 1962 State Highway Map signed over the entirety of LRN 107 and LRN 108.

1962 State Highway Map

My approach to CA 84 west over the Santa Cruz Mountains was from I-280 south.  From Exit 25 on I-280 south on pulled onto CA 84 west on Woodside Road.




CA 84 west follows Woodside Road through Woodside.  Woodside dates back to 1849 and is mostly known for it's lumber days when Redwood Sequoias were milled in the area.



Traffic on CA 84 west in Woodside that trucks over 30 feet in length are not recommended.


One of the few reassurance shields on CA 84 west in the Santa Cruz Mountains appears in Woodside past Canada Road.



West of Woodside CA 84 follows Woodside Road through the heavily wooden Bear Gulch.







CA 84 west makes a turn onto La Honda Road.



CA 84 west makes an ascent to the crest of the Santa Cruz Mountains on La Honda Road.  La Honda Road is very curvy and was being overwhelmed by water flowing down out of the Santa Cruz Mountains.
















CA 84 west meets CA 35 on Skyline Boulevard at the ridge of the Santa Cruz Mountains.  Unfortunately someone had stolen all the CA 35 shields at pretty much every junction on Skyline Boulevard.



CA 84 west of CA 35 on La Honda Road follows La Honda Creek and begins to descend from the crest of the Santa Cruz Mountains.







CA 84 west meets Old La Honda Road on it's descent through the Santa Cruz Mountains.


Old La Honda Road is a single-lane old logging road that features steep grades and sharp drop-offs.

Old La Honda Road

CA 84 west on La Honda Road continues to follow La Honda Creek to community of the same name.  La Honda dates back to the 1860s and much like Woodside was center around lumber mills.









West of La Honda CA 84 picks up San Gregorio Creek.


CA 84 west follows San Gregorio Creek into an ever widening expanse of lush canyons approaching San Gregorio.










At the intersection of Stage Road CA 84 west enters San Gregorio.


San Gregorio dates back to the 1850s and still has an appearance of an early Gold Rush Era community.  The San Gregorio General Store has been in operation since been operation since 1889.


Stage Road is a very early alignment of CA 1 and appears on the 1935 San Mateo County Division of Highways Map above.



CA 84 west terminates at CA 1 at San Gregorio State Beach.  While the end of CA 84 doesn't have much fanfare the view from the cliffs above San Gregorio State Beach are worth making the trip across the Santa Cruz Mountains to see.




Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Signed County Route J37; the last Signed Tulare County Route and the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road

Recently I drove the entirety of Signed County Route J37 located in rural Tulare County.  Signed County Route J37 is notable in that it is the last Signed County Route which actually has field signage left in Tulare County and was intended to be part of a Trans-Sierra Highway known as the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road.


While researching California State Route 190 and more specifically the gap in the highway over the Sierra Nevada Range it became quickly apparent that there was far more to J37/Balch Park Road than initially thought.  The previous blog on California State Route 190 can be found here:

California State Route 190; the Trans-Sierra Highway that could have been 

On the above blog I attached an article from 1926 written by the Los Angeles Times detailing the route of the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road which was slated to begin construction in 1927.  The route of the Lone Pine to Porterville High Sierra Road would have followed Carroll Creek southward out…

Paper Highways of the Mojave Desert and San Gabriel Mountains; CA 48 (ii), CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249

In this edition Paper Highways the planned California State Highways of the Mojave Desert and San Gabriel Mountains are explored.  This issue will cover the planned routes of; the second CA 48, CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249.



Part 1; the wholesale Legislative Route adoptions of 1959

CA 48, CA 122, CA 196, and CA 249 prior to the 1964 State Highway Renumbering all were adopted as planned Legislative Routes ("LRN") in 1959.  Part of the planned LRN 267 west of Lancaster was already part of the existing CA 138 on LRN 59.  CA 48 east of Lancaster was planned as LRN 267 which was to have an eastern terminus at LRN 266.  LRN 266 was planned to originate from CA 2/LRN 61 near La Canada Flintridge and cross north/northeast over the San Gabriel Mountains into the Mojave Desert near Palmdale.  LRN 266 was planned to continue northeast from Palmdale to former US 466/LRN 48 near Hawes.  LRN 266 became CA 249 and CA 122 during the 1964 State Highway Renumbering.  LRN 269 was planned to be rou…

Former US Route 99,US Route 466, and California State Route 65 through Famoso

This past weekend I explored the alignments of US Route 99, US Route 466, and California State Highway 65 through Famoso.



Part 1; The history of State Highway service in Famoso

Famoso is a ghost town and former Southern Pacific Railroad siding located in northern Kern County on Poso Creek.  The site of Famoso is located roughly at the junction of CA 99 and CA 46.  Famoso was founded as a Southern Pacific Railroad siding known as "Poso" during the early 1870s when the Southern Pacific Railroad was building it's main freight line through San Joaquin Valley.  The name of Poso was changed in 1888 to Spottiswood when the community received a spur line of the Southern Pacific and Post Office Service.  The community name of Poso was already in use by a mining community to the west in San Luis Obispo County which required a new name be chosen to establish Post Office Service.  The name of Spottiswood was changed to Famoso in 1895.

Famoso was an important early highway junction in…