Skip to main content

Powerscourt Covered Bridge

The Powerscourt Covered Bridge, also known as the Percy Covered Bridge, is Canada's oldest covered bridge. Not only is it the oldest covered bridge in Canada, it is the only known example of a McCallum inflexible arched truss bridge still in existence. The covered bridge was built in 1861 over the Chateauguay River on First Concession Road near Hinchinbrooke, Quebec, just north of the border with New York State. The Powerscourt Covered Bridge is the only non-railroad bridge in the world using the McCallum inflexible arched truss design. This design was developed by Daniel McCallum, who was an engineer for the New York and Erie Railroad, and superintendent of railroads for the Union side in the Civil War. The techniques in building the two span Powerscourt Covered Bridge was otherwise used exclusively in the construction of railroad bridges. Because of the Powerscourt Covered Bridge's unique place in history, it was designated a National Historic Site in 1984 and the bridge was restored in 2009.

In this southwestern corner of Quebec between the border with New York and the St. Lawrence River, you will find an unique blend of French and English heritage. English Loyalists settled there after the Revolutionary War and some French Canadians decided to settle across the border in New York to farm. If you look at a map, you will find names like Huntingdon, Elgin, Hinchinbrooke and Hemmingford among the towns that dot this part of Quebec. As for nearby Powerscourt, it was once a much busier place, but today, there are just a few houses, a church building and a sturdy reminder of this region's past, present and future, the Powerscourt Covered Bridge.

The entrance into the Powerscourt (Percy) Covered Bridge. As a covered bridge fan, I made a long detour west down QC 202 to see this bridge, on a trip that eventually took me to Montreal.
Plaque commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Powerscourt Covered Bridge.
Inside the covered bridge.
Bridge plaques.
Note the curved roof on the covered bridge, another feature that is unique to this bridge.

How to Get There:

Sources and Links:
Canada's Historic Places - Powerscourt Covered Bridge National Historic Site of Canada
North Country Public Radio - Powerscourt, home to Canada’s oldest covered bridge
Mother Nature Network - North America's Most Charming Covered Bridges
Montreal Gazette - Gallery: Powerscourt Bridge
Library of Congress - Powerscourt Bridge
Nature Notes - Powerscourt (Percy) Covered Bridge

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California

The historic corridor of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 through the borderlands of southern California share a largely mutual history.  Both highways originated in the city of San Diego and departed the state at the Colorado River into Yuma, Arizona.  Both highways share numerous famous geographical components such as the Mountain Springs Grade and Algodones Sand Dunes.  This article serves as a comprehensive history of the combined US Route 80/Interstate 8 corridor in California from the tolled stage route era of the nineteenth century to the development of the modern freeway.   The blog cover photo features US Route 80 along the Mountains Springs Grade through In-Ko-Pah Gorge during late 1920s.  This photo is part of the Caltrans McCurry Collection. Part 1; the history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California share a largely mutual history.  The backstory of both highways is tied heavily to the corridors of the Old Spanish Trail, Legisl

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

The Midway Palm and Pine of US Route 99

Along modern day California State Route 99 south of Avenue 11 just outside the City limits of Madera one can find the Midway Palm and Pine in the center median of the freeway.  The Midway Palm and Pine denotes the halfway point between the Mexican Border and Oregon State Line on what was US Route 99.  The Midway Palm is intended to represent Southern California whereas the Midway Pine is intended to represent Northern California.  Pictured above the Midway Palm and Pine can be seen from the northbound lanes of the California State Route 99 Freeway.   This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page The history of the Midway Palm and Pine The true timeframe for when the Midway Palm and Pine (originally a Deadora Cedar Tree) were planted is unknown.  In fact, the origin of the Midway Palm and Pine w