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Powerscourt Covered Bridge

The Powerscourt Covered Bridge, also known as the Percy Covered Bridge, is Canada's oldest covered bridge. Not only is it the oldest covered bridge in Canada, it is the only known example of a McCallum inflexible arched truss bridge still in existence. The covered bridge was built in 1861 over the Chateauguay River on First Concession Road near Hinchinbrooke, Quebec, just north of the border with New York State. The Powerscourt Covered Bridge is the only non-railroad bridge in the world using the McCallum inflexible arched truss design. This design was developed by Daniel McCallum, who was an engineer for the New York and Erie Railroad, and superintendent of railroads for the Union side in the Civil War. The techniques in building the two span Powerscourt Covered Bridge was otherwise used exclusively in the construction of railroad bridges. Because of the Powerscourt Covered Bridge's unique place in history, it was designated a National Historic Site in 1984 and the bridge was restored in 2009.

In this southwestern corner of Quebec between the border with New York and the St. Lawrence River, you will find an unique blend of French and English heritage. English Loyalists settled there after the Revolutionary War and some French Canadians decided to settle across the border in New York to farm. If you look at a map, you will find names like Huntingdon, Elgin, Hinchinbrooke and Hemmingford among the towns that dot this part of Quebec. As for nearby Powerscourt, it was once a much busier place, but today, there are just a few houses, a church building and a sturdy reminder of this region's past, present and future, the Powerscourt Covered Bridge.

The entrance into the Powerscourt (Percy) Covered Bridge. As a covered bridge fan, I made a long detour west down QC 202 to see this bridge, on a trip that eventually took me to Montreal.
Plaque commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Powerscourt Covered Bridge.
Inside the covered bridge.
Bridge plaques.
Note the curved roof on the covered bridge, another feature that is unique to this bridge.

How to Get There:

Sources and Links:
Canada's Historic Places - Powerscourt Covered Bridge National Historic Site of Canada
North Country Public Radio - Powerscourt, home to Canada’s oldest covered bridge
Mother Nature Network - North America's Most Charming Covered Bridges
Montreal Gazette - Gallery: Powerscourt Bridge
Library of Congress - Powerscourt Bridge
Nature Notes - Powerscourt (Percy) Covered Bridge

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