Skip to main content

Lyndhurst Bridge

Ontario's oldest surviving bridge is located in the picturesque village of Lyndhurst, in the eastern part of the province. Constructed in 1857 over the Gananoque River, some 10 years prior to Canadian Confederation, the Lyndhurst Bridge is a beautiful and traditionally designed three arch bridge made of local field stone and local Nepean sandstone. The Lyndhurst Bridge was designed and constructed by local residents. While the bridge was built by Miles Fulford and Simon Ransom, the bridge was designed by an employee of a local mill owner, Scottish native John Donald Roddick, who came to Lyndhurst about 1853. It is said that the design of the Lyndhurst Bridge is similar to older bridges that are in Scotland. Using local materials also meant that the bridge was able to use some local touches in the construction of the bridge, such as mill stones from local mill owner Henry Green for decoration.




Once the bridge was completed, it became the focal point of the Lyndhurst community, which was once home to five mills at the time the bridge was built. The arches of the bridge also divided the water rights between the mill owners, one of whom was John Donald Roddick. The Lyndhurst Bridge still is a focal point of Lyndhurst, and while traffic only holds one lane at a time, the bridge was strengthened in 1986 by the addition of a load bearing concrete slab inside the deck system. While this retrofitting relieves the bridge from having to bear the loads of traffic, but some engineering historians may not be thrilled that the arch no longer serves a functional purpose. The alteration is not visible to anyone since it is hidden under the deck, and it likely prevented the need for alterations to the stonework, which appears to retain its historic integrity. Today, local residents and curiosity seekers can enjoy the history and uniqueness of the oldest bridge in Ontario by taking a stroll across the bridge or viewing it from nearby Furnace Falls Park.

The story of the Lyndhurst Bridge in English.

... and in French.

Viewing the bridge from nearby Furnace Falls Park.

The bridge is one lane wide, and you can also spy the flared edge of the end of the bridge.

The stone work on the bridge itself looks quite long.
A close-up of the local stone used in the bridge's stonework. Using local stone meant not having to obtain stone from a far away quarry.

This bridge is indeed historic.

The surrounding village of Lyndhurst is also worth checking out. If you have some time to poke around town, it is certainly a charming place to visit.

The Green Gecko.

A home painted like gift wrap. I passed through a few weeks before Christmas, so this may be a fitting decoration.

This cairn is to remember the Lansdowne Iron Works, which was the first iron works located in Upper Canada. The Lansdowne Iron Works is a national historic site that opened in 1801, but was destroyed by fire in 1811. Not much remains of the iron works today.

Remains of a mill on the Gananoque River, just beyond the Lyndhurst Bridge.


How to Get There:


Sources and Links:
HistoricBridges.org - Lyndhurst Bridge
Frontenac Arch Biosphere - Lyndhurst Heritage Walking Tour
Ontario's Historical Plaques - The Lyndhurst Bridge
Ontario Beneath Our Feet - Lyndhurst Bridge
Ontario Heritage Trust - The Lyndhurst Bridge 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Old California State Route 140 and California State Route 120 entrances to Yosemite National Park

This past October I sought out the original Yosemite National Park entrance alignments of California State Route 140 and California State Route 120.


Presently CA 120 enters Yosemite National Park in Tuolumne County via the modern Big Oak Flat Road.  Originally CA 120 entered Yosemite National Park via the Old Tioga Pass Road and CA 140 a entered via the Old Big Oak Flat Road.  Previously the history of the Big Oak Flat Road and Tioga Pass Road were discussed on Gribblenation.  Articles pertaining to the Big Oak Flat Road and Tioga Pass Road within the boundary of Yosemite National Park can be found below.

History of the Big Oak Flat Road (Yosemite National Park) 

The Tioga Pass Road


Part 1; early highways into Yosemite and Legislative Route 40

The Big Oak Flat Road is the second oldest highway into Yosemite just behind the Old Coulterville Road  Much of the alignment of CA 120 is presently incorporated by the path set out by the Big Oak Flat Road.  The history of the Big Oak Flat Road …

US Route 101 from Cannon Beach, Oregon over the Columbia River via the Astoria-Megler Bridge

This past September I drove a segment of US Route 101 from Cannon Beach, Oregon northward over the Columbia River into Washington State via the Astoria-Megler Bridge.


US 101 from Cannon Beach, Oregon northward to Megler, Washington is a shade under 30 miles.  Despite the short length this particular segment of US 101 has several notable locales in; Cannon Beach, Seaside, Astoria and the Astoria-Megler Bridge.


My trip on US 101 began in downtown Cannon Beach after taking US 26 on the Sunset Highway west out of Portland.


Cannon Beach is an incorporated City within Clatsop County with an approximate population of around 1,700.   Cannon Beach is located on the Pacific Ocean off of Ecola Creek.  Ecola Creek and what is now Cannon Beach was explored by William Clark of the Lewis & Clark Expedition in 1805.  During the ensuing decades a small community known as Elk Creek was settled near Ecola Creek.   In 1846 a cannon from the wrecked USS Shark landed south of Elk Creek near Arch Cape. …

Box Canyon Road (former US 60, US 70 and the second California State Route 195)

This past month while visiting Riverside County I drove Box Canyon Road from Interstate 10 near Chiriaco Summit southwest to Mecca in Coachella Valley.  Box Canyon Road is mostly known for being the original alignment of US 60/70 when they were expanded into California.


Box Canyon Road is an approximately 15.8 mile road between I-10/Cottonwood Springs Road near Chiriaco Summit which travels southwest through the Mecca Hills to Coachella Valley where it becomes 66th Avenue. 


Box Canyon Road follows a naturally cut wash through the terrain of the Mecca Hills.  The path of Box Canyon Road has been a known route of travel from Coachella Valley to the Colorado River and eastern Sonoran Desert for centuries.  During the California Gold Rush a wagon route known as the Bradshaw Trail was plotted through the Sonoran Desert by William D. Bradshaw.  The Bradshaw Trail was plotted in 1862 through the Sonoran Desert east over the Colorado River to a new mining strike found in La Paz, Arizona.  B…