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Interstate 375 and Interstate 175

While I was finishing a photo-clinch of Interstate 275 I decided to make two short detours in St. Petersburg to do the same with Interstate 375 and Interstate 175.


I-375 is a 1.2 mile Interstate carrying the hidden Florida State Road 592 designation which spans from I-275 east to US 19A in downtown St. Petersburg.  I-175 just to the south is a 1.3 mile Interstate carrying the hidden FL 594 designation from I-275 to FL 687.

I-375 in it's present configuration opened to traffic in 1979.  Originally I-375 was slated to extend west of I-275 to a toll road facility that would be built to connect northward to Clearwater.  Ultimately these aspirations failed leaving something of a lame duck feeder freeway that I-375 is today.

My approach to I-375 was on I-275 southbound.  I took I-275 Exit 23A and turned onto I-375 east towards downtown St. Petersburg.


I-375 east is signed as the "C. Bette Wimbush Highway."


The view of downtown St. Petersburg on the ramp to I-375 is actually pretty scenic.


Traffic to Tropicana Field is directed to exit onto Martin Luther King Jr. Street while US 92/4th Street traffic is directed to continue eastward on I-375.




Traffic is given copious warning that I-375 east is about to end.  I-375 east ends at US 19A on 4th Avenue on unsigned FL 595 just short of US 92 at 4th Street.  I've often found it odd that US 92 was never extended over FL 595 westward to the mainline US 19 which would largely clear up the strange terminus points.  Even extending US 92 south on FL 687 to I-175 would make more sense.





I looped back onto I-375 west from US 19A on 5th Avenue.



There isn't much on I-375 west aside from a direct connection back to I-275.




I-175 opened to traffic in it's current configuration in 1980.  Originally the route that became I-175 was intended to become part of the much larger Pinellas Belt Expressway which would have extended west of I-275.

I headed south on I-275 to the junction with I-175 east at Exit 22.


Tropicana Field traffic is directed to use Martin Luther King Jr. Street/8th Street.  Downtown traffic to FL 687 on 4th Street is directed to stay on I-175 east.




The John Hopkins All Children Hospital is signed off the 6th Street Exit on I-175 east.



As I-175 east ends in downtown St. Petersburg at FL 687 on at 4th Street traffic is advised that the Dali Museum and Mahaffey Theater are ahead.




Traffic can almost immediately loop back onto I-175 east via 4th Street, 4th Avenue and 6th Street.





I-175 west essentially is a direct shot back to I-275.






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