Skip to main content

Interstate 375 and Interstate 175

While I was finishing a photo-clinch of Interstate 275 I decided to make two short detours in St. Petersburg to do the same with Interstate 375 and Interstate 175.


I-375 is a 1.2 mile Interstate carrying the hidden Florida State Road 592 designation which spans from I-275 east to US 19A in downtown St. Petersburg.  I-175 just to the south is a 1.3 mile Interstate carrying the hidden FL 594 designation from I-275 to FL 687.

I-375 in it's present configuration opened to traffic in 1979.  Originally I-375 was slated to extend west of I-275 to a toll road facility that would be built to connect northward to Clearwater.  Ultimately these aspirations failed leaving something of a lame duck feeder freeway that I-375 is today.

My approach to I-375 was on I-275 southbound.  I took I-275 Exit 23A and turned onto I-375 east towards downtown St. Petersburg.


I-375 east is signed as the "C. Bette Wimbush Highway."


The view of downtown St. Petersburg on the ramp to I-375 is actually pretty scenic.


Traffic to Tropicana Field is directed to exit onto Martin Luther King Jr. Street while US 92/4th Street traffic is directed to continue eastward on I-375.




Traffic is given copious warning that I-375 east is about to end.  I-375 east ends at US 19A on 4th Avenue on unsigned FL 595 just short of US 92 at 4th Street.  I've often found it odd that US 92 was never extended over FL 595 westward to the mainline US 19 which would largely clear up the strange terminus points.  Even extending US 92 south on FL 687 to I-175 would make more sense.





I looped back onto I-375 west from US 19A on 5th Avenue.



There isn't much on I-375 west aside from a direct connection back to I-275.




I-175 opened to traffic in it's current configuration in 1980.  Originally the route that became I-175 was intended to become part of the much larger Pinellas Belt Expressway which would have extended west of I-275.

I headed south on I-275 to the junction with I-175 east at Exit 22.


Tropicana Field traffic is directed to use Martin Luther King Jr. Street/8th Street.  Downtown traffic to FL 687 on 4th Street is directed to stay on I-175 east.




The John Hopkins All Children Hospital is signed off the 6th Street Exit on I-175 east.



As I-175 east ends in downtown St. Petersburg at FL 687 on at 4th Street traffic is advised that the Dali Museum and Mahaffey Theater are ahead.




Traffic can almost immediately loop back onto I-175 east via 4th Street, 4th Avenue and 6th Street.





I-175 west essentially is a direct shot back to I-275.






Comments

Popular posts from this blog

US Route 101 in Benbow, Garberville and Redway

The communities of Benbow, Garberville and Redway can all be found along US Route 101 within southern Humboldt County.  The former surface alignment of US Route 101 in Garberville and Redway once crossed the Garberville Bluffs along what is now Redwood Drive via a corridor constructed as part of the Redwood Highway during the 1910s.  US Route 101 through Benbow, Garberville and Redway was modernized by 1935.  US Route 101 would eventually be upgraded to freeway standards in Benbow, Garberville and Redway by extension of the Redwood Freeway during 1966-68.  As the cover photo the original grade of US Route 101 and the Redwood Highway can be seen at the Garberville Bluffs during 1934.  US Route 101 can be seen in the communities of Benbow, Garberville and Redway on the 1935 Division of Highways Map of Humboldt County .   The history of US Route 101 in Benbow, Garberville and Redway Benbow, Garberville and Redway lie on the banks of the South Fork Eel River of southern Humboldt County.  D

Highways in and around Old Sacramento; US 40, US 99W, CA 16, CA 24, CA 70, CA 99, CA 275, and more

This past weekend I was visiting the City of Sacramento for a wedding.  That being the case I decided to head out on a morning run through Old Sacramento, Jibboom Street Bridge, I Street Bridge, Tower Bridge, and path of US Route 40/US Route 99W towards the California State Capitol.  My goal was to retrace the paths of the various highways that once traversed the Old Sacramento area. This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page The old highway alignments of Sacramento The City of Sacramento lies at the confluence of the Sacramento River and American River in Sacramento Valley.  Sacramento Valley was discovered by Spanish Explorer Gabriel Moraga in 1808.  Moraga referred to the fertile Sacramento Valley akin to a "Blessed Sacrament."  By 1839 John Sutter Sr. settled in Mexican held

Old Stage Road in Tulare County and Kern County

Old Stage Road is an approximately 30-mile rural highway comprised of Tulare County Mountain Road 1, Kern County Mountain Road 447 and Tulare County Mountain Road 109.  Old Stage originates at Jack Ranch Road near Posey and ends at the outskirts of Porterville at Deer Creek.  Old Stage Road notably is comprised of two 19th Century stage routes.  From White Mountain Road northwest to Fountain Springs, Old Stage Road overlays Thomas Baker's 1860s era stage road to Linn Valley (now Glennville) and the Kern River Gold Rush Claims.  From Fountain Springs to Deer Creek, Old Stage Road is comprised of the 1853 Stockton-Los Angeles Road. Featured as the blog cover is the northward descent on Old Stage Road along Arrastre Creek to the town site of White River.  What became White River was settled along a spur of the Stockton-Los Angeles Road as "Dog Town" when gold was discovered nearby.  By 1856 the community had been renamed Tailholt.  A stage road from Tailholt to Linn Valley w