Skip to main content

Florida State Road 50 Part 2; Sumter County

Picking up from Part 1 of the Florida State Road 50 series Part 2 covers the sections of the highway headed eastward within Sumter County.


Part 1 of the Florida State Road 50 series can be found below:

Florida State Road Part 1; history of the highway and Hernando County portion

As stated in Part 1 the route of FL 50 east enters the Green Swamp in eastern Hernando County.  At the Little Withlacoochee the route of FL 50 enters Sumter County.



At County Road 757 the route of FL 50 east meets it's original right of way which once continued west to Riverland Road in Hernando County.


Back in 2014 I spent time tracking down former alignments of what is now FL 50 on the north side of the Green Swamp in Hernando County and Sumter County.  As stated above the original right of way that likely was part of early FL 50 used was Riverland Road in Hernando County and County Road 757 in Sumter County to cross the Little Withlacoochee River.  The original right of way can be seen on the 1936 Hernando County and 1936 Sumter County Road Map from Part 1.

Heading westward from modern FL 50 towards the Little Withlacoochee reveals a narrow roadway with several abandoned homes.






County Road 757 ends at a gate just short of the Little Withlacoochee River and Hernando County Line.  The former community of Riverland and Richloam are to the west on Riverland Road on the Hernando County side.



Back tracking west to Hernando County briefly.  In Part 1 of the Florida State Road 50 series the original route right of way is shown on rhe 1936 Eastern Hernando County road map diverting from the modern highway at Clay Sink-Richloam Road.  From Clay Sink-Richloam Road the original highway entered the community of Richloam and turned eastward towards the Little Withlacoochee River to Riverland here on Riverland Road.  Below is the turn from Clay Sink-Richloam Road eastward on Riverland Road. 


Returning to modern FL 50 the highway next has a junction with CR 478A just east of County Road 757.


FL 50 east enters the community of Tarrytown where it has a junction with FL 471.  FL 471 is the primary north/south road through the Green Swamp.



Tarrytown was a lumber town that was along the Orange Belt Railway.  Although Tarrytown is still listed as an active community there isn't very much left that one would discern as "town like."  On the northeast corner FL 50 and FL 471 there is one older structure that was recently repainted.  The Orange Belt Railway used to cross through the sawmill located on the southwest side of FL 50 and FL 471.  The Orange Belt Railway operated during the late 1880s and early 1890s before being reorganized.  The Orange Belt Railway eventually was acquired by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad in 1902.


FL 50 east of FL 471 to the Van Fleet Trail is signed as a "Florida Scenic Highway."


East of FL 471 the route of FL 50 has Groveland listed 13 miles away while Orlando is shown as 42 miles away.


FL 50 east quickly enters the community of Linden.


The original right of way diverted from modern FL 50 in Linden at County Road 772B.  The original highway crossed over to the south side of Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, the path of County Road 772B still bears marks from a former crossing.  To the left of the photo below the Atlantic Coast Line was located between County Road 772B and modern FL 50.  The original highway continued east on County Road 772B where it rejoined modern FL 50 in Mabel near the Van Fleet Trail.


Linden as a community is very old and dates back to the 1840s.





The Scenic portion of FL 50 east ends in Mabel at the Van Fleet Trail.  Oddly FL 50 doesn't directly connect to the Van Fleet Trail which can only be accessed via County Road 772B.  The Van Fleet Trail is a 29.2 paved trail through the Green Swamp which was built on the grade of the Florida Western and Northern corridor line of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad.




East of Mabel the route of FL 50 intersects CR 469 which accesses Center Hill.



East of CR 469 the route of FL 50 enters Lake County.


Part 3 of the Florida State Road 50 series features the highway in Lake County.

Florida State Road 50 Part 3; Lake County


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Establishing the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates

The Federal Highway Aid Act of 1956 brought the Interstate Highway System into existence which would largely be constructed by Federal Highway Administration fund matching.  The Interstate Highway System was deliberately numbered to run opposite the established conventions of the US Route System.  While the Interstate Highway numbering conventions are now well established there was a period during the late 1950s where they were still being finalized.  This blog examines the history of the establishing of the chargeable Interstate Highway route numbers in California.  The above blog cover depicts the Interstate Highway route numbers requested by the Division of Highways in the Los Angeles area during November 1957.  The establishment of the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates The Interstate Highway System was not created in a vacuum by way of the passage of the 1956 Federal Highway Aid Act.  The beginning of the Interstate Highway System can be found in the

The western end of US Route 6 and Laws Depot on the Carson & Colorado Railway

Back in June of 2016 I visited the western terminus of US Route 6 at US Route 395 located in Bishop, California of Inyo County on my way to Laws Depot. US 6 is one of the longest US Routes at 3,205 miles between Bishop, CA east to Provincetown, MA.  Historically US 6 was the longest US Route ever when it ended in Long Beach at 3,652 miles.  US 6 is known as the Grand Army of the Republic Highway and is mostly known for traveling through some of the most rural corners of the Continental United States. The endpoint of US 6 expanded wildly westward during the early US Route era.  Below is a summary of endpoints for US 6 that are listed on USends.com: 1927-1931 -  Provincetown, MA west to Erie, PA 1932-1937 -  Provincetown, MA west to Greeley, CO 1937-1964 -  Provincetown, MA west to Long Beach, CA 1964-Present -  Provincetown, MA west to Bishop, CA US 6 was one of the routes heavily truncated during the 1964 California Highway Renumbering.  US 6 had a large mul

Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley from wagon trails to Interstates

Over the past two decades I've crossed the Interstate 5 corridor from Los Angeles north over the Sierra Pelona Mountains and Tehachapi Range to San Joaquin Valley what seems to be an immeasurable number of times.  While Interstate 5 from Castaic Junction to Grapevine via Tejon Pass today is known to most as "The Grapevine" it occupies a corridor which has been traversed by numerous historic highways.  The most notable of these highways is known as the "Ridge Route."  This article is dedicated to the Ridge Route and the various highways that preceded it.  This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page Ridge Route corridor introdution The Ridge Route as originally envisioned was a segment of highway which was completed in 1915 between the northern Los Angeles city limit