Skip to main content

California State Route 109

On the south side of San Francisco Bay between US Route 101 and California State Route 84 there are to unsigned short surface routes; CA 109 and CA 114.  Both CA 109 and CA 114 are located with the boundaries of Menlo Park and East Palo Alto, this entry is about the former route CA 109.


CA 109 is a 2 mile state highway running on University Avenue between US 101 in East Palo Alto to CA 84 in Menlo Park.  Northbound traffic departing US 101 from exit 403 must join Donohoe Street and take a brief western jog to reach CA 109 on University Avenue.



CA 109 north travels through East Palo Alto and enters Menlo Park at Notre Dame Avenue.  Notre Dame Avenue north to CA 84 was the first segment of CA 109 that was adopted by Caltrans.  Traffic is slow with speed limits as low as 25 MPH in East Palo Alto.






CA 109 on University Avenue crosses a set of rails before terminating at CA 84.




The north terminus of CA 109 is within view of modern Dumbarton Bridge crossing San Francisco Bay.  The Dumbarton Bridge is a Twin Concrete Girder design which is 1.63 miles in length.  The modern Dumbarton Bridge was opened to traffic in 1984 and was a replacement for the 1927 span which was the first highway crossing of San Francisco Bay.


According to CAhighways the current routing of CA 109 was created in 1984 from CA 84 south on University Avenue to Notre Dame Avenue.  In 1988 legislation was passed which allowed CA 109 to be extended south on University Avenue to US 101 but maintenance wasn't picked up apparently until 1997.

CAhighways on CA 109

The first CA 109 was along Sunset Cliffs Boulevard in San Diego.  The first CA 109 first appears on the State Highway Map in 1964 and was apparently created out of legislation in 1963 according to CAhighways.org.  The original CA 109 was deleted in 1972 and became an extension of I-8. 

1964 State Highway Map 

Interestingly the second CA 109 appears on the 1986 State Highway Map City Insert as CA 209 running south from CA 84 to Notre Dame Avenue.

1986 State Highway Map City Insert

On the 1988 State Highway Map City Insert CA 109 is shown correctly, I'm not sure if the 1986 map was an error.

1988 State Highway Map City Insert

CA 109 appears as a complete route between CA 84 and US 101 on the 1990 State Highway Map City Insert.

1990 State Highway City Insert

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Smithtown Bull in Smithtown, New York

  Before I moved to Upstate New York as a young man, I grew up in the Long Island town of Smithtown during the 1980s and 1990s. The recognizable symbol of Smithtown is a bronze statue of a bull named Whisper, located at the junction of NY Route 25 and NY Route 25A near the bridge over the Nissequogue River. Why a bull, you may ask. The bull is a symbol of a legend related to the town's founding in 1665 by Richard "Bull" Smythe, with a modernized name of Richard Smith. It also so happens that there is a story behind the legend, one that involves ancient land right transfers and some modern day roads as well. So the story goes that Smythe made an agreement with a local Indian tribe where Smythe could keep whatever land he circled around in a day's time riding atop his trusty bull. Choosing the longest day of the year for his ride, he set out with his bull Whisper and went about riding around the borders of the Town of Smithtown. As legend has it, Smythe t

The Midway Palm and Pine of US Route 99

Along modern day California State Route 99 south of Avenue 11 just outside the City limits of Madera one can find the Midway Palm and Pine in the center median of the freeway.  The Midway Palm and Pine denotes the halfway point between the Mexican Border and Oregon State Line on what was US Route 99.  The Midway Palm is intended to represent Southern California whereas the Midway Pine is intended to represent Northern California.  Pictured above the Midway Palm and Pine can be seen from the northbound lanes of the California State Route 99 Freeway.   The history of the Midway Palm and Pine The true timeframe for when the Midway Palm and Pine (originally a Deadora Cedar Tree) were planted is unknown.  In fact the origin of the Midway Palm and Pine was referenced in California's Gold Episode #608 during which Huell Howser examined numerous points claimed to be the Center of California.  During Episode #608 Huell Howser interviews Caltrans employee Bob Thompson who emphasizes there wa

Erie Canal: Little Falls and Moss Island

  Little Falls, New York is a small city in the Mohawk Valley that has been shaped by the forces of water throughout its history. Nowhere in Little Falls is that more evident than at Moss Island. Representing the Industrial Age, this is home of Lock 17 the tallest lock along the Erie Canal, but there is also evidence of the Ice Age in the form of 40 foot deep glacial potholes from when there was an ancient waterfall that was even larger than Niagara Falls at this spot, once draining Glacial Lake Iroquois when other outlets (such as the St. Lawrence River) were blocked by retreating glaciers. While Little Falls does not have the amount of industry around the river and canal than it once had, checking out what Moss Island has to offer is a great way to see what the city has to offer. Visiting Moss Island allows you to experience the engineering marvel that is the Erie Canal plus the wonders of nature by taking a hike around the island and seeing the glacial potholes. A