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Travel New England - Woodstock, Vermont

Woodstock is a charming town along US 4 in Central Vermont.  Less than an hour's drive from Lebanon, New Hampshire and Dartmouth College or the ski areas of Killington, the town is considered by some as "The Prettiest Small Town in America."  Woodstock is a blend of small shops, fine dining, inns, art galleries, rolling farmlands, and centuries old homesteads. 

The Woodstock 'Town Crier' Bulletin Board adds to the town's New England charm.
Woodstock's town square, known as "The Green",  is the centerpiece of the town.  From May through October, it is home to a weekly farmer's market.  Also, other events occur on The Green including an annual lobster dinner.  The Woodstock Village Green is also home to a New England legend of a vampire's heart being burned and ashes buried on the Green.  This and other legends throughout New England date to the New England Vampire Panic of the early 19th century.



Adding to its idealistic New England setting, Woodstock is also home to a covered bridge.  The Middle Covered Bridge which carries Mountain Avenue over the Ottaquechee River was built in 1969.  This rare "modern" town lattice covered bridge actually replaced an iron bridge which had stood since 1877.  The Middle Bridge has been a survivor of two damaging events.  The first event occurred in 1974 when arsonists set the bridge ablaze.  The damage took three years and a cost of $55,000 to repair.  More recently, the rains of Hurricane Irene damaged the Middle and other nearby bridges.


One of the interesting features of the Middle Bridge is the incorporated covered sidewalk that allows for spectacular views of the Ottaquechee River.  In addition, something I found interesting is that both portals of the bridge are in different stains.  The north portal is painted white; while the south portal consists of a more natural stain.


The town of around 3,000 people dates back to prior to the Revolutionary War.  Chartered in 1761, Woodstock has transitioned from rural farming community to an early manufacturing town to the  tourist destination that it is today.  

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