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Lanny Wilson resigns from NC Board of Transportation and Turnpike Authority Board

(Editors Note: I am trying to get as many blog entries done as possible prior to the NC State/North Carolina Basketball game.  I have about three or four more entries including a response to a reader's comment to do.)

Within the past week, Lanny Wilson, a Wilmington developer, resigned from both the State Board of Transportation and his vice chairmanship on the board of the North Carolina Turnpike Authority.  Wilson, who was a key fundraiser for the campaigns of former governor Mike Easley and current governor Beverly Perdue, served on the State Board of Transportation for nine years and on the NCTA's board since 2002. 

Wilson was appointed to the State Board of Transportation by then governor Easley.

Wilson's name has come up in an North Carolina Board of Elections investigation and hearing on campaign finance violations.  He testified in an October Board of Elections' hearing on contributions to the North Carolina Democrat Party and Easley's 2004 re-election campaign.

Wilson's testimony was a key part in the indictment of former Easley aide Ruffin Poole on 51 counts of corruption.

Story Links:
DOT board member linked to Easley case resigns ---WRAL-TV
Lanny Wilson resigns as local representative to N.C. transportation board ---Wilmington Star-News
Lanny Wilson resigns from Turnpike Authority board ---Bruce Siceloff
Wilson, staunch supporter of Skyway project, resigns from toll road board ---Wilmington Star-News

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