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California State Route 113; a little bit of vintage US 40, US 40A, US 99W and CA 24

Upon leaving the Bay Area I turned off Interstate 80 and headed eastward into the Sacramento River Delta on California State Route 12.  My next destination was California State Route 113 northbound which is partially made of segments of what was; US Route 40, US Route 40A, US Route 99W and California State Route 24.


CA 113 is a 59 mile north/south State Highway which was created out various previous designations during the 1964 State Highway Renumbering.  Specifically the current route of CA 113 was created out of the following highway segments:

-  From CA 12 in the Sacramento River Delta north to I-80 was part of Legislative Route Number 101.  LRN 101 was added to the State Highway system between LRN 53 (later CA 12) and LRN 7/US 40 in Dixon in 1933 according to CAhighways.org.

CAhighways.org on LRN 101

The current route of CA 113 in Dixon along 1st Street from Adams Street north I-80 was part of the original path of US 40/LRN 7.  US 40 originally traversed Dixon using the following alignment eastbound from Vacaville:

-  Monte Vista Avenue to the present alignment of I-80 near Allison Drive.
-  The alignment of I-80 to Midway Road.
-  Midway Road to Porter Road.
-  Port Road to Adams Street in Dixon.
-  Adams Street to 1st Street in Dixon.
-  1st Street out of Dixon to Curry to Sievers Road.
-  Sievers Road to Signed County Route E7/Pedrick Road.
-  E7/Pedrick Road to Yolo County Line.

The above alignment is visible on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Solano County.

1935 Solano County Highway Map

By 1942 US 40/LRN 7 was moved to new alignment between Dixon east to Davis which is on the present grade of I-80.

1942 State Highway Map

By 1948 US 40/LRN 7 bypassed Dixon headed east from Vacaville on the present grade of I-80.

1948 State Highway Map

CA 113 from I-80 north to I-5 occupies the corridor which was part of LRN 7 and was signed as CA 24, US 40A and US 99W.   LRN 7 was part of the highways which were approved during the 1909 First State Highway Bond Act.  In original scope the 1909 definition of LRN 7 was from Tehama Junction south to Benicia.

CAhighways.org on LRN 7

The corridor CA 113 occupied along LRN 7 carries significance as it carried parts of US 40, US 40A and US 99W.  When the US Route were designated US 40 east met US 99W in Davis, both routes continued east to Sacramento on LRN 6.  US 99W occupied the rest of the LRN 7 corridor north through Woodland where CA 113 now meets I-5.  LRN 7/US 99W continued north to Red Bluff where it met LRN 3/US 99E.  The 1930 State Highway Map shows the designations of US 40 and US 99W on LRN 7 from Davis to Woodland.

1930 State Highway Map

The original route of US 40 through Davis from the Solano County line eastward is as follows:

-  Signed County Route E7/Pedrick Road to Russell Boulevard.
-  Russell Boulevard to East Street where US 40 met US 99W.  Both US 40/US 99W continued eastward on LRN 6 into Davis and by proxy Sacramento.  US 99W northward towards Woodland was on LRN 7.
-  Russell Boulevard to B Street.
-  B Street to 1st Street.
-  Likely 1st Street to Richards Boulevard.
-  Likely Richards Boulevard to Olive Drive.
-  Olive Drive merges into the present alignment of I-80 which appears to have been a direct replacement of US 40/US 99W east to Sacramento.

The route of US 99W on LRN 7 north from US 40 through Woodland originally used the following alignment:

-  East Street which is partially under the alignment of the CA 113 freeway to Main Street in Woodland.
-  Main Street to County Road 98.

The above alignments of US 40 and US 99W between Davis and Woodland can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Yolo County.

1935 Yolo County Highway Map 

By 1942 US 40 on the LRN 7 corridor bypassed around Davis roughly on the alignment of present I-80.  The path of US 99W from Davis to Woodland appears to have remained the same.

1942 State Highway Map

Oddly US 99W seems to have been shifted west of Davis onto the original alignment west of the city by 1944.

1944 State Highway Map

By 1955 a new direct link route for US 99W from US 40 to East Street appears on the State Highway Map.  Said junction of US 99W/US 40 was also the origin point of US 40A.  US 40A split from US 99W in Woodland on LRN 87 which was previously occupied by CA 24.   US 40A followed the current CA 113 corridor on LRN 87 to Tudor.

1955 State Highway Map

In 1934 the Signed State Highways were approved by the State Legislature.  CA 16/CA 24 multiplexed west out of Sacramento to Woodland via the I-Street Bridge over the Sacramento River.  CA 16/CA 24 entered Woodland westward on Main Street and met US 99W at East Street.  CA 16 multiplex US 99W on Main Street whereas CA 24 continued northward towards Tudor on LRN 87.  The original configuration of CA 16/CA 24 through Woodland can be seen on the 1938 State Highway Map.

1938 State Highway Map

In 1955 CA 24 still multiplexed CA 16 into Woodland but at the junction of US 40A/US 99W.  CA 24 was eventually moved to a new route over the Jibboom Street Bridge on LRN 232 to Marysville.  LRN 232 was open by 1958 but CA 24 wasn't moved onto it until 1960.

1958 State Highway Map 

1960 State Highway Map

US 40A continued to utilize the corridor of CA 113 on LRN 87 to Tudor until the 1964 State Highway Renumbering.  LRN 87 was approved by the State Legislature in 1933 as a highway running from Woodland north to Oroville.

CAhighways.org on LRN 87

During the 1964 Highway Renumbering CA 113 was created out of what was LRN 101, US 99W and US 40A between CA 12 north to Tudor.   Despite the changes the new route was only assigned as LRN 113 while parts of the new highway remained signed as US 99W/US 40A.  These changes can be seen by comparing the 1963 State Highway Map to the 1964 edition.

1963 State Highway Map

1964 State Highway Map

By 1965 CA 113 appears to have been signed from Davis north to Tudor.  US 40A disappears from the State Highway Map but US 99W remained.

1965 State Highway Map

By 1967 the route of US 99W disappears and CA 113 appears to have been fully signed.

1967 State Highway Map

According to CAhighways.org the first segment of CA 113 between Davis and Woodland to be upgraded freeway standards was complete by 1976 which ran north of I-80 to County Road 27.  The second segment of CA 113 from County Road 27 north to I-5 was completed to freeway standards by 1990.

CAhighways.org on CA 113

I started my journey northward on CA 113 from CA 12 in the Sacramento River Delta in southern Solano County on what was LRN 101.


The first approximately 19 miles of CA 113 north on Rio Dixon Road.  CA 113/Rio Dixon Road is in poor repair and generally below modern state highway standards.





At Hastings Road the path of CA 113/Rio Dixon Road takes two 90 degree jogs and crosses over the path of the Sacramento Northern Railway.










North of Midway Road the path of CA 113 enters Dixon on 1st Street.



CA 113 north on 1st Street enters downtown Dixon which has an origin point at A Street.


CA 113 on 1st Street crosses a set of rails north of downtown Dixon and picks up Adams Street.  This is where the former segment of US 40 mentioned above begins.



The Historic US 40 signage on CA 113/1st Street is of a somewhat odd design and appears to be somewhat aged judging from how much weathering is on the placard.


North of Vaughn Road CA 113 jumps onto I-80 east.  US 40 originally continued ahead directly north to Sievers Road.



I-80 east/CA 113 north is well signed with dual shields being displayed, the freeway guide signs show Davis as only 6 miles away.  I-80 east/CA 113 north meets Signed County Route E7 at Exit 67 for Pedrick Road.


CA 113 north splits from I-80 east at Exit 70 into Davis and Yolo County




Exit 27 on CA 113 north is signed as access to U.C. Davis.


At Exit 29 CA 113 meets a junction with CR E6 at Road 31.


North of Road 31 the path of the CA 113 freeway shows Woodland as 7 miles away whereas I-5 is shown as 9 miles away.


CA 113 north of Road 31 is signed as Vic Fazio Highway.


At Road 27 the path of the CA 113 freeway reaches the end of the segment completed in 1976.  CA 113 would have continued north to Woodland via East Street until the remaining freeway segment was completed in 1990.  This would be the point of divergence between modern CA 113 and US 99W/US 40A.



The CA 113 freeway enters Woodland.  I-5 south traffic is directed to take the former alignment of CA 16/CA 24 via Main Street at Exit 37.




The CA 113 freeway ends and the travel lanes enter I-5 north.  The junction of CA 113 north with I-5 north is signed as "CHP Sgt Gary R Wagers Memorial Highway."




CA 113 north quickly leaves I-5 north via Exit 538 to East Street.  East Street was the original alignment of CA 24 and later US 40A.





CA 113 north of Woodland is essentially the same alignment as the original corridor of LRN 87.   Knight's Landing at CA 45 is signed as 12 miles to the north.


CA 113 takes various 90 degree cuts through the farmland north of I-5 before meeting CR E10 at Zamora Road.














CA 113 cuts directly east from CR E10 to CR E8 where it cuts north again into Knight's Landing.






Knight's Landing was founded in 1843 as steam boat landing on the Sacramento River.  At 4th Street CA 113 meets CA 45 which follows the Sacramento River towards Chico.  CA 113 crosses the Sacramento River northward towards Tudor and it's terminus at CA 99.  CA 24 and US 40A followed the remaining path of CA 113 to Tudor.  I turned on CA 45 from Knight's Landing but if I get the opportunity I plan on expanding this blog with the rest of CA 113 to Tudor.



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