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California State Route 83

 

California State Route 83 is a 11.1-mile State Highway located entirely in San Bernardino County.  California State Route 83 is presently defined as beginning at California State Route 71 and ending to the north at Interstate 10 in Upland.  California State Route 83 is signed on Euclid Avenue through its entire routing.  Pictured above as the blog cover is signage of California State Route 83 from eastbound Foothill Boulevard along former US Route 66 in Upland on a segment of the highway which was relinquished in 2006.  




The history of modern California State Route 83

The current California State Route 83 (CA 83) is the second highway to be designated with the number.  For background on the original CA 83 please refer to the below blog:

The mystery of the original California State Route 83

The history of modern CA 83 begins in 1933 when the State removed the barriers which prevented the Division of Highways from maintaining mileage within incorporated cities.  This measure led to a large influx of urban mileage being added to the State inventory during 1933.  One such routing was Legislative Route Number 192 (LRN 192) defined by Legislative Chapter 767:

"LRN 77 via Euclid Avenue to LRN 190 in Upland"

13 miles of Euclid Avenue is announced as being annexed as LRN 192 in the April 1933 California Highways & Public Works

LRN 192 thusly first appears on the 1934 Division of Highways Map.  LRN 192 was not assigned one of the original Sign State Routes which were announced in the August 1934 California Highways & Public Works.  



LRN 192 on Euclid Avenue appears in detail on the 1935 Division of Highways Map of San Bernardino County.  LRN 192 is displayed as ending at LRN 190/Olive Street in Upland and CA 71/LRN 77 at Pine Avenue.  


The May/June 1948 California Highways & Public Works announced a contract to place actuated traffic signals at LRN 192/Euclid Avenue at US Route 66/LRN 9 at Foothill Boulevard.   


The March/April 1953 California Highways & Public Works references the history of Euclid Avenue.  Euclid Avenue is described as the main highway connecting the cities of Ontario and Upland.  The incorporation of Ontario is cited to have occurred during 1891 whereas Upland incorporated during 1906.  The pepper trees lining the median of Euclid Avenue are described as being planted by the Chaffey family during 1883-1884.    



The May/June 1953 California Highways & Public Works announced CA 30 was aligned past the northern terminus of LRN 192 via LRN 190.  


CA 30/LRN 190 can be seen for the first time passing the northern terminus of LRN 192 on the 1954 Division of Highways Map.  


The May/June 1958 California Highways & Public Works announced funding had been released to construct a new interchange between CA 71/LRN 77 and LRN 192.  


The May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works noted that the CA 71/LRN 77 Corona Freeway Interchange with LRN 192 was scheduled to be completed during June 1959.  The project included 5.3 miles of the Corona Freeway to Merrill Avenue as a Super Two Freeway.  1959 Legislative Chapter 1062 simplified the definition of LRN 192 as "LRN 77 to LRN 190 in Upland." 


LRN 192/Euclid Avenue appears extended south to CA 71/LRN 77 and the initial segment of the Corona Freeway on the 1960 Division of Highways Map.  The 1960 Division of Highways Map also displays the simplified definition of LRN 192.  



As part of the 1964 State Highway Renumbering the Legislative Route Numbers were dropped.  All former Legislative Route Numbers lacking a Sign State Route were assigned one.  Thusly what was LRN 192 on Euclid Avenue was reassigned as the second iteration of CA 83.  CA 83 on Euclid Avenue first appears on the 1964 Division of Highways Map.  The original definition of CA 83 was "Route 71 to Route 30 near Upland."



1999 Assembly Bill 1650, Chapter 724 changed the terminus of CA 83 to Route 210 which reflected the redesignation of CA 30 the year prior.  Despite the northern terminus of CA 83 being changed to CA 210 it did not move the highway beyond 19th Street at Postmile SBD 14.193.  The city of Upland opted for ramps to CA 210 to be built at Campus Avenue and Mountain Avenue which isolated the northern tip of CA 83 at the intersection of Euclid Avenue and 19th Street. 

2006 Assembly Bill, Chapter 248 authorized the relinquishment of CA 83 in the city of Upland.  The legislative action required Upland to maintain CA 83 signage on Euclid Avenue to the continuation of the highway.  CA 83 north of Interstate 10 was formally relinquished during June 2008 which brought the highway to its current length of 11.1 miles.  2010 Assembly Bill 1318, Chapter 421 changed the northern terminus of CA 83 to "Route 10 near Upland.  

2021 Assembly Bill 744, Chapter 198 changed the northern terminus of CA 83 to "Route 10 near the city of Upland."  Chapter 198 also authorized the relinquishment of CA 83 in the city of Ontario if the city and state could reach an agreement.  As this blog is being published Ontario has not come to a relinquishment agreement to accept maintenance of CA 83 on Euclid Avenue.  

Notably Upland seems to have upheld their end of the 2006 relinquishment of CA 83 as they continue to sign the highway.  The uni-sign shown as the blog cover can be found on eastbound Foothill Boulevard (former US Route 66 and CA 66) which displays CA 83 as existing in both directions.  The uni-sign placed by the city of Upland stands out due to it not being Caltrans specification. 


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