Skip to main content

Can someone help a bloke out?

I received an e-mail overnight from a gentleman in England. In it he asks:

I came upon your site when I was looking for Pennsylvania signs. I am making a tour in September to look for locations from the film 'Something Wild (1986)'. Could you tell me if this sign might be somewhere in the north east of Pennsylvania? I'm thinking it may be somewhere along routes 97 or 209. Thank you for any help you may be able to give me.


Here's the photo he had attached.



I am guessing it is from the movie. I've never seen a Welcome to Pennsylvania sign like this. It looks like there are deer inside each Keystone. Has anyone seen this type of Welcome to PA guide sign before? And is his guess to its location accurate?



Comments

Anonymous said…
Some road scenes for "Catch Me if You Can" that were supposed to take place in NY's Hudson Valley were filmed in Quebec, so it may not even be in PA at all.
Doug said…
A good place to check filming locations is http://www.imdb.com/. A quick check of locations from this movie shows me New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Florida.
Anonymous said…
The same guy emailed me asking about another scene from Something Wild (1986). In question is a scene of a light post with some sort of identification marker on the sign.

I was able to get him help on his last email query, an arizona scene from Gumball Rally (1976) thanks to some of the SoCal road enthusiasts. However I have no clue about this scene or the one emailed to me however.
Anonymous said…
I've definitely seen that sign, and I live in Pa. I think it is somewhere in the upper NE quadrant of the state on the way back from Jersey. Maybe even 209. Sorry couldn't help more. Why not contact some towns along the route?

Popular posts from this blog

Horace Wilkinson Bridge (Baton Rouge, LA)

Standing tall across from downtown Baton Rouge, the Horace Wilkinson Bridge carries Interstate 10 across the lower Mississippi River between West Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parishes. Unusually, the bridge is actually named for three separate people; three generations of Horace Wilkinsons who served in the Louisiana State Legislature over a combined period of 54 years. Constructed in the 1960s and opened to traffic in 1968, this is one of the largest steel bridges on the lower Mississippi. It’s also the tallest bridge across the Mississippi, with its roadway reaching 175 ft at the center span. Baton Rouge is the northernmost city on the river where deep-water, ocean-going vessels can operate. As a result, this bridge is the northernmost bridge on the river of truly gigantic proportions. Altogether, the bridge is nearly 2 ½ miles long and its massive truss superstructure is 4,550 ft long with a center main truss span of 1,235 ft. The Horace Wilkinson Bridge is one of the largest

Sunshine Bridge (Donaldsonville, LA)

Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and New Orleans in southern Louisiana, the Sunshine Bridge spans the lower Mississippi River near the city of Donaldsonville as part of the longer Louisiana Highway 70 corridor, which connects Interstate 10 and Airline Highway (US 61) with US 90 in Morgan City. In the years following World War II, the only bridges across the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana were located in the area of the state’s two largest cities – Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Postwar agricultural and industrial development along the river in this region led to the planning of a series of infrastructure projects in southern Louisiana that were aimed at spurring this development and modernization of the Delta region. One of these projects was known as the Acadian Thruway and was developed in the 1950s as a toll road intended to connect greater New Orleans with Lafayette and points west while providing a high-speed bypass of the Baton Rouge metro area. The Thruway, which

Natchez-Vidalia Bridge (Natchez, MS)

  Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and Vicksburg near the city of Natchez, the Natchez-Vidalia Bridge crosses the lower Mississippi River between southwest Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana at the city of Vidalia. This river crossing is a dual span, which creates an interesting visual effect that is atypical on the Mississippi River in general. Construction on the original bridge took place in the late 1930s in conjunction with a much larger parallel effort by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to strengthen the area’s flood protection and levee system along the Mississippi River. One of the more ambitious aspects of this plan was to relocate the city of Vidalia to a location of higher ground about one mile downriver from the original settlement. The redirection of the river through the Natchez Gorge (which necessitated the relocation of the town) and the reconstruction of the river’s levee system in the area were undertaken in the aftermath of the Great Flood of 1927, wh