Skip to main content

60-mph divided highways in NC

Evidently, NCDOT has quietly decided to start signing certain highways with 60-mph speed limits rather than the typical 55 mph. Problem is, no one seems interested in admitting what highways are now signed with the higher limit.

The roads being considered for the higher limit are restricted-access, which means they don't have driveways coming off the sides but do have surface intersections rather than full interchanges. As of right now, the only roads I know of that are signed with the higher limit are NC 11 between Kinston and Winterville and US 17 from Elizabeth City to the Virginia state line. Beyond those, rumor has it that there are up to ten other highways that are eligible for the higher limits, but I haven't seen what they are or if they are signed with the new limits. One road that could have the higher limit, the NC 24/903 bypass of Kenansville in Duplin County, is still signed at 55 as of this past weekend.

Interestingly, freeway limits aren't being touched, even for 55-mph bypasses like the US 70 New Bern bypass and the US 17/NC 24 Jacksonville bypass -- at least, not yet.

So does anyone else know where the higher limits are either in place or planned to be put in?

Comments

Doug said…
I have seen similar arrangements for a 60 mph speed limit in Virginia, particularly along US 29. Can't speak so much for North Carolina, unless I go through my photos and spot a rogue 60 mph speed limit sign.
Anonymous said…
WV has had 60MPH expressways since the NMSL repeal.
Anonymous said…
It is now 60 mph on US 17 on the Shallotte bypass .

And 60 mph on US 74 around Laurinburg up to Maxton .

It is about time as much as 90 % of rural NC highways could be safely raised to 65-70 mph without issue . It is just plain stupid to continue to have the 100 % ignored 55 mph unless otherwise posted rule . This outdated law is from the 1940s to be still in effect on NC roads is just silly .

Our roads are safer , our cars are safer it is about time that this is taken into account when setting our posted speed limits across NC .

Popular posts from this blog

The Bayshore Freeway (US Route 101)

The Bayshore Freeway is a 56.4-mile component of US Route 101 located in the San Francisco Bay Area.  The Bayshore Freeway connects the southern extent of San Jose to the Central Freeway in the city of San Francisco.  The corridor was originally developed as the Bayshore Highway between 1923 and 1937.  The Bayshore Highway would serve briefly as mainline US Route 101 before being reassigned as US Route 101 Bypass in 1938.  Conceptually the designs for the Bayshore Freeway originated in 1940 but construction would be delayed until 1947.  The Bayshore Freeway was completed by 1962 and became mainline US Route 101 during June 1963.   Part 1; the history of the Bayshore Freeway Prior the creation of the Bayshore Highway corridor the most commonly used highway between San Jose and San Francisco was El Camino Real (alternatively known as Peninsula Highway).  The  American El Camino Real  began as an early example of a signed as an Auto Trail starting in 1906.  The era of State Highway Mainte

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 41 through Paso Robles

Paso Robles is a city located on the Salinas River of San Luis Obispo County, California.  As originally configured the surface alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 converged in downtown Paso Robles.  US Route 101 originally was aligned through Paso Robles via Spring Street.  California State Route 41 entered the City of Paso Robles via Union Road and 13th Street where it intersected US Route 101 at Spring Street.  US Route 101 and California State Route 41 departed Paso Robles southbound via a multiplex which split near Templeton.   Pictured above is the cover of the September/October 1957 California Highways & Public Works which features construction of the Paso Robles Bypass.  Pictured below is the 1935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County which depicts US Route 101 and California State Route 41 intersecting in downtown Paso Robles.   Part 1; the history of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 in Paso Robles Paso Robles ("Pass of the

Paper Highways; US Route 20 Alternate over Teton Pass

The 8,431-foot-high Teton Pass lies in the Teton Range of the Rocky Mountains within Teton County, Wyoming.  Presently Teton Pass is crossed by Wyoming Highway 22 and Idaho State Highway 33.  At one point the highway over Teton Pass was signed as US Route 20 Alternate.  US Route 20 Alternate was over Teton Pass never formally approved by the American Association of State Highway Officials nor has the corridor ever been officially part of a US Route.  The image above was taken from the 1949 Rand McNally Map of Idaho, Wyoming and Montana which shows US Route 20 Alternate branching from US Route 20/US Route 191 near Sugar City, Idaho and crossing Teton Pass towards Jackson, Wyoming.   Part 1; the history of US Route 20 Alternate over Teton Pass No major Auto Trail was ever assigned to Teton Pass as evidenced by the 1925 Rand McNally Map of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming .  On the Wyoming side Teton Pass can be seen as part of Wyoming Highway 25 ("WY 25") whereas no State Highway is