Skip to main content

Freeport Covered Bridge - Quebec

 



Located in Cowansville, Quebec, the Freeport Covered Bridge (or Pont de Freeport, in French) was built in 1870 and spans 91 feet long over the Yamaska River, west of downtown Cowansville. The covered bridge was constructed in the Town through truss design that is fairly common throughout Quebec. The covered bridge and the former village of Freeport where the Freeport Covered Bridge is located was built was named for Freeman Eldridge, who was a builder in the region which include built the first Anglican church in Freeport in 1855. The former village of Freeport, along with the former villages of Sweetsburg and Nelsonville, were combined in 1876 to form Cowansville.

This historic covered bridge as led a quiet existence for most of its lifespan so far. The Freeport Covered Bridge underwent some renovations in 1992, where steel support was added to its infrastructure. In 2014, modern street lighting was added to the bridge. Additional restorations were made with the addition of headache bars after being damaged twice by large trucks over the years. There is a sign on both sides of the bridge asking cars to honk before entering its dark interior, as it is a narrow one lane bridge. The covered bridge is a local attraction and you have the opportunity to enjoy the surroundings of this bridge with its distinctive red color paneling. Picnic tables and parking was added for tourists to come to visit, plus there is a small trail that allows you to get some sneak peaks of the bridge from a different angle.

A view of the east portal of the covered bridge, along with a headache bar meant to protect the bridge from damage.

Side profile of the bridge near the picnic area. I couldn't get a great photo of the bridge from this angle.

Inside the covered bridge.

Bridge plaque.

View of the covered bridge from the west portal.


How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
QuebecPanorama - Pont couvert - Pont de Freeport
Structurae - Pont de Freeport
1000 Towns of Canada - Pont Couvert Freeport
DaleJTravis.com - Quebec Covered Bridges

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Yes, the color of your nearby fire hydrant matters...

...and here's why. You will find White, Red, Yellow and Violet colored fire hydrants pretty much everywhere.  But there's a reason for this - and it's because of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  This association has issued guidelines for color coding standards for fire hydrants.  These color codes from the body of the hydrant, top of the hydrant, and in some municipalities the outlet caps are designed to allow fire fighters to know what type of system, water flow rate (Gallons Per Minute or GPM), and level of water pressure.  This guideline is known as NFPA 291 and is intended to be used universally throughout the United States. The NFPA guidelines are specific to the body and the top cap of the hydrant.  If a hydrant is WHITE or YELLOW - it means that it is connected to a public/municipal water system.  If a hydrant is RED - the hydrant is connected to a private system, typically a well.  These are most common in rural or unincorporated areas

Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley from wagon trails to Interstates

Over the past two decades I've crossed the Interstate 5 corridor from Los Angeles north over the Sierra Pelona Mountains and Tehachapi Range to San Joaquin Valley what seems to be an immeasurable number of times.  While Interstate 5 from Castaic Junction to Grapevine via Tejon Pass today is known to most as "The Grapevine" it occupies a corridor which has been traversed by numerous historic highways.  The most notable of these highways is known as the "Ridge Route."  This article is dedicated to the Ridge Route and the various highways that preceded it.  This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page Ridge Route corridor introdution The Ridge Route as originally envisioned was a segment of highway which was completed in 1915 between the northern Los Angeles city limit

Establishing the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates

The Federal Highway Aid Act of 1956 brought the Interstate Highway System into existence which would largely be constructed by Federal Highway Administration fund matching.  The Interstate Highway System was deliberately numbered to run opposite the established conventions of the US Route System.  While the Interstate Highway numbering conventions are now well established there was a period during the late 1950s where they were still being finalized.  This blog examines the history of the establishing of the chargeable Interstate Highway route numbers in California.  The above blog cover depicts the Interstate Highway route numbers requested by the Division of Highways in the Los Angeles area during November 1957.  The establishment of the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates The Interstate Highway System was not created in a vacuum by way of the passage of the 1956 Federal Highway Aid Act.  The beginning of the Interstate Highway System can be found in the