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California State Route 232

This past month I drove the entirety of California State Route 232 in Ventura County.


CA 232 is an approximately 4 miles State Highway aligned on Vineland Avenye which begins near Saticoy at CA 118 and traverses southwest to US Route 101 in Oxnard.  The alignment of CA 232 was first adopted into the State Highway System in 1933 as Legislative Route Number 154 according to CAhighways.org.

CAhighways.org on LRN 154

As originally defined LRN 154 was aligned from LRN 9 (future CA 118) southwest to LRN 2/US 101 in El Rio.  This configuration of LRN 154 between CA 118/LRN 9 and US 101/LRN 2 can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Ventura County.

1935 Ventura County Highway Map

According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 154 was extended west from US 101/LRN 2 to US 101A/LRN 60 in 1951.  Unfortunately State Highway Maps do not show this extension due to it being extremely small.

During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 154 was assigned CA 232.  Of note; the western  terminus of US 101A was reassigned as part of CA 1 during the 1964 State Highway Renumbering.  The change from LRN 154 to CA 232 can be seen by comparing the 1963 State Highway Map to the 1964 Edition.

1963 State Highway Map

1964 State Highway Map

According to CAhighways.org the route of CA 232 was planned as a freeway from 1965 onward.  Given the size of CA 232 were few State Highway Maps show the planned freeway route of CA 232 in much detail.  The 2005 State Highway Map shows that CA 232 the planned freeway route appears to be a western extension of the Simi Valley (Ronald Reagan Freeway.

2005 State Highway Map City Insert

According to CAhighways.org the route of CA 232 was put up for relinquishment in the City of Oxnard in 2008.  This relinquishment became effective in 2013 and the definition of CA 232 was changed from starting at CA 118 headed southwest to US 101 in 2014.  Of interest the relinquishment agreement explicitly states that CA 232 shall continue to be signed by the City of Oxnard.

CAhighways.org on CA 232

My approach to CA 232 westbound was from CA 118 eastbound at the Santa Clara River on the outskirts of Saticoy.  From CA 118 east traffic is advised that US 101 is 3 miles to the west on CA 232.  As noted above CA 232 is completely aligned on Vineland Avenue.  The east terminus of CA 232 is shown on the Caltrans Post Mile Tool as VEN R4.102.



Interestingly the control city signage on CA 232 west shows US 101 as being 4 miles away.


CA 232 essentially is a four-lane undivided highway all the way west into Oxnard.  Approaching US 101 the speed limit of CA 232 gradually begins to decline.








CA 232 as noted above officially terminates at US 101 on the Ventura Freeway.  The approximate Post Mileage for the west terminus of CA 232 is shown on the Caltrans Post Mile Tool as VEN 0.402.



As noted above the City of Oxnard per the 2013 relinquishment agreement is responsible for still signing CA 232 in their jurisdiction.  CA 232 is still shown as of May 2019 signed from former CA 1 on Oxnard Boulevard.

Google Street Car Image of Oxnard Boulevard/Vineland Avenue

Comments

Unknown said…
A small correction, it's Vineyard Avenue, not Vineland.

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