Skip to main content

The National Road - Pennsylvania - Brownsville to Washington


The National Road travels through the heart of Centerville. (Adam Prince)
As you exit Brownsville and continue further west, the next town along the National Road is Centerville.  The heart of this small town is located along the original routing of the National Road located just north of modern US 40.  The town, which was founded in 1821, was a central stopping point for stagecoaches between Uniontown and Washington.  Because of its location between the two cities, Centerville was a very prominent location in the early days of the National Road.  Because of its location there are several historic former inn and taverns within or just outside of the town's limits. 

The former Riggle Tavern in Centerville.  (John Grable)
One of these historic former tavern's is Riggle Tavern located just west of Centerville.  The tavern was owned by Zaphania Riggle, who would own numerous taverns along the pike in Washington County.  The tavern that bears his last name was burned under his ownership; however, it was immediately rebuilt.  Mr. Riggle transferred ownership of the tavern in 1845 to Peter Colley. (1)

The former Stephen Hill's Tavern, now Century Inn, located in Scenery Hill. (The Bee Family)
Further west, you will come across Hill's Tavern.  The building, which was constructed in 1794, is located in Scenery Hill.  The Village of Scenery Hill is definitely worth a stop while traveling the National Road.  Scenery Hill is a popular tourist destination and is home of many quaint restaurants and antique shops.  Hill's Tavern is now named 'The Century Inn.'  The Inn can lodge up to 19 guests and also can dine and entertain up to 150 patrons in five separate dining rooms.  Across the street is 'Zephanie Riggle's House of Entertainment.'  The intriguingly named inn can also lodge up to nine guests.  Tragically, in August of 2015, a devastating fire heavily damaged the Century Inn.  Fortunately, the fire occurred on a Monday night when the inn and restaurant is closed.   In April of 2017, it was announced that reconstruction of the Century Inn was underway and that they hope to reopen the inn and restaurant in the fall of 2017.

The Century Inn also is home to a rare framed flag of the Whiskey Rebellion.  The Rebellion was a Southwestern Pennsylvanian farmers revolt on a federal excise tax on liquor.  It was quickly dissolved by President Washington without any fighting.  Fortunately, the flag was saved during the August 2015 fire.  The flag is the only known surviving flag from the Whiskey Rebellion. 


The Flag of the Whiskey Rebellion.  (Mike Austing)


Site Navigation:
Sources & Links:
  • Mike Austing
  • The Bee Family
  • John Grable
  • (1) Grable, John, "Additions to web page." Personal e-mail. May 2, 2005.
  • The Century Inn

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

When did people begin to refer to the "Ridge Route" as "The Grapevine?" (former US Route 99 and Interstate 5)

The segment of US Route 99 from Los Angeles north to Bakersfield was traditionally known in State Highway documents as the "Ridge Route."  Even as the Ridge Route was transitioning from curvy mountain grade to the facility now occupied by Interstate 5nthe name largely persisted in California Highways & Public Works documents.  During modern times the name "Ridge Route" has be usurped in popular lexicon in favor to the nickname known as "The Grapevine."  This blog will attempt to decipher the origins of "The Grapevine" and how it came into popular use today.  Featured as the blog cover photo is a view of Interstate 5 in Grapevine Canyon and former US Route 99 at Deadman's Curve of the Ridge Route. This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page Note:

US Route 101 in Benbow, Garberville and Redway

The communities of Benbow, Garberville and Redway can all be found along US Route 101 within southern Humboldt County.  The former surface alignment of US Route 101 in Garberville and Redway once crossed the Garberville Bluffs along what is now Redwood Drive via a corridor constructed as part of the Redwood Highway during the 1910s.  US Route 101 through Benbow, Garberville and Redway was modernized by 1935.  US Route 101 would eventually be upgraded to freeway standards in Benbow, Garberville and Redway by extension of the Redwood Freeway during 1966-68.  As the cover photo the original grade of US Route 101 and the Redwood Highway can be seen at the Garberville Bluffs during 1934.  US Route 101 can be seen in the communities of Benbow, Garberville and Redway on the 1935 Division of Highways Map of Humboldt County .   The history of US Route 101 in Benbow, Garberville and Redway Benbow, Garberville and Redway lie on the banks of the South Fork Eel River of southern Humboldt County.  D

Ghost Town Tuesday; The Ghost Towns of Lake Okeechobee

The 1928 Lake Okeechobee Hurricane was the second most deadly in U.S. history behind the 1900 Galviston Hurricane.  The Category 5 Hurricane first hit Puerto Rico before moving to Florida with winds sustained at 160 MPH.  The path of the hurricane took it directly over Lake Okeechobee which is the largest lake in Florida and headwaters of the Everglades.  The Lake Okeechobee Hurricane raised the water level by at least 20 feet and wiped out many of the surrounding communities. In total it is estimated that there was at least 2,500 fatalities related to the Lake Okeechobee Hurricane in Florida.   A general list of the communities destroyed by the Lake Okeechobee Hurricane include; Port Mayaca, Sand Cut, Canal Point, Pahokee, Belle Glade, South Bay, Okeelanta, Bean City, Ritta Island, Lake Harbor, Chosen, and Kreamer Island.  Some communities like Belle Glade eventually were rebuilt but others became ghost towns largely wiped clean.  In response to the Lake Okeechobee Hurricane the H