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Rotterdam residents want NY 7 improvements

The section of NY 7 from the Interstate 88 Exit 25 Access Road and Dunnsville Road has seen a great increase in truck traffic over the past three to five years, and residents want to see a better and safer road.

The cause for the extra truck traffic: The continued growth and expansion of Galesi Group’s Rotterdam Corporate Park. The park which is located less than three miles from I-88 and the NY Thruway also sits on a busy CSXT rail line. Currently, the Park includes distribution centers for Price Chopper, FedEx, and Railex. Distribution Unlimited is the park's largest operation.

In addition, other companies are looking at the surrounding area for warehouse and distribution centers. McLane Foodservice is looking at a site adjacent to the I-88 Exit 25 ramps for a possible distribution site.

Residents are glad to see the additional business and jobs to the area but are concerned about the traffic issues and problems. Beginning at hte Exit 25 access ramps and to the traffic signal at Dunnsville Road, residents believe that there are quite enough possibilities for improvements.

The light at the I-88 ramps is one of the bigger tie-ups. A four way intersection with the I-88 ramp, NY 7 and Becker Drive which leads to a local subdivision can be troublesome in the morning. Truck traffic can stretch on the ramp to I-88 Westbound and light delays can last 15 minutes. There are a few factors to this issue. First, morning rush hour traffic to the Corporate Center and other business in Rotterdam (Exit 25 is the best and only access point into Rotterdam from I-88 or the NY Thruway). Traffic for Mohonasen High School which sits between I-88 and the Golub Park. Plus, the daily truck traffic in and out of the various distribution centers. (For 18 of the 24 months I lived in the area, my office was across the street from the Golub Center and I would face the traffic daily).

Residents are also concerned about the more frequent accidents occurring on the highway.

There are also tie-ups at the Dunnsville Road signalized intersection with the NY 7. Although earlier in the decade there were intersection improvements made, traffic has been known to back up in both directions in NY 7 as the truck queue is too large for the entrance to handle.

Some improvements have been made, but residents shouldn't expect anything drastic. Recently, there has been a third entrance added to the Corporate Park. The Dunnsville Road Guard Shack has been placed further back allowing more trucks to queue without backing up traffic on NY 7.

The state plans to lengthen the turning lanes at the I-88 and Becker Drive traffic light, along with the addition of No Parking signs. More often, trucks have been overnighting on the shoulders of the I-88 ramps and NY 7.

But with an average traffic volume of 14,000 vehicles per day, the state doesn't consider the two lane NY 7 as 'heavily traveled' enough.

Story: Schenectady Daily Gazette

Commentary:

As I mentioned earlier, I have experience with this stretch of NY 7. From Feb. 2005 to August 2006, my company's office was located across from the Rotterdam Corporate Park. The biggest issue for me was the back-up at the Becker Drive light at the end of the I-88 Exit 25 ramps. I do hope that a simple and not as costly measure of improving the timing and signalization of this light has been done or is being considered. It would be a great safety measure considering the traffic at the light for the school, the trucks to the various distribution centers, and just normal daily traffic.

I think the Quikway Gas Station could expand its parking lot allowing truck overnight parking. Other than that, NY 7 in this area goes through a rather residential area. There's not much that can be improved. You really can't make it a four lane road. But you can improve the turning lanes, signals and shoulders it will be a great help.

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