Skip to main content

Rotterdam residents want NY 7 improvements

The section of NY 7 from the Interstate 88 Exit 25 Access Road and Dunnsville Road has seen a great increase in truck traffic over the past three to five years, and residents want to see a better and safer road.

The cause for the extra truck traffic: The continued growth and expansion of Galesi Group’s Rotterdam Corporate Park. The park which is located less than three miles from I-88 and the NY Thruway also sits on a busy CSXT rail line. Currently, the Park includes distribution centers for Price Chopper, FedEx, and Railex. Distribution Unlimited is the park's largest operation.

In addition, other companies are looking at the surrounding area for warehouse and distribution centers. McLane Foodservice is looking at a site adjacent to the I-88 Exit 25 ramps for a possible distribution site.

Residents are glad to see the additional business and jobs to the area but are concerned about the traffic issues and problems. Beginning at hte Exit 25 access ramps and to the traffic signal at Dunnsville Road, residents believe that there are quite enough possibilities for improvements.

The light at the I-88 ramps is one of the bigger tie-ups. A four way intersection with the I-88 ramp, NY 7 and Becker Drive which leads to a local subdivision can be troublesome in the morning. Truck traffic can stretch on the ramp to I-88 Westbound and light delays can last 15 minutes. There are a few factors to this issue. First, morning rush hour traffic to the Corporate Center and other business in Rotterdam (Exit 25 is the best and only access point into Rotterdam from I-88 or the NY Thruway). Traffic for Mohonasen High School which sits between I-88 and the Golub Park. Plus, the daily truck traffic in and out of the various distribution centers. (For 18 of the 24 months I lived in the area, my office was across the street from the Golub Center and I would face the traffic daily).

Residents are also concerned about the more frequent accidents occurring on the highway.

There are also tie-ups at the Dunnsville Road signalized intersection with the NY 7. Although earlier in the decade there were intersection improvements made, traffic has been known to back up in both directions in NY 7 as the truck queue is too large for the entrance to handle.

Some improvements have been made, but residents shouldn't expect anything drastic. Recently, there has been a third entrance added to the Corporate Park. The Dunnsville Road Guard Shack has been placed further back allowing more trucks to queue without backing up traffic on NY 7.

The state plans to lengthen the turning lanes at the I-88 and Becker Drive traffic light, along with the addition of No Parking signs. More often, trucks have been overnighting on the shoulders of the I-88 ramps and NY 7.

But with an average traffic volume of 14,000 vehicles per day, the state doesn't consider the two lane NY 7 as 'heavily traveled' enough.

Story: Schenectady Daily Gazette

Commentary:

As I mentioned earlier, I have experience with this stretch of NY 7. From Feb. 2005 to August 2006, my company's office was located across from the Rotterdam Corporate Park. The biggest issue for me was the back-up at the Becker Drive light at the end of the I-88 Exit 25 ramps. I do hope that a simple and not as costly measure of improving the timing and signalization of this light has been done or is being considered. It would be a great safety measure considering the traffic at the light for the school, the trucks to the various distribution centers, and just normal daily traffic.

I think the Quikway Gas Station could expand its parking lot allowing truck overnight parking. Other than that, NY 7 in this area goes through a rather residential area. There's not much that can be improved. You really can't make it a four lane road. But you can improve the turning lanes, signals and shoulders it will be a great help.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Route 75 Tunnel - Ironton, Ohio

In the Ohio River community of Ironton, Ohio, there is a former road tunnel that has a haunted legend to it. This tunnel was formerly numbered OH 75 (hence the name Route 75 Tunnel), which was renumbered as OH 93 due to I-75 being built in the state. Built in 1866, it is 165 feet long and once served as the northern entrance into Ironton, originally for horses and buggies and later for cars. As the tunnel predated the motor vehicle era, it was too narrow for cars to be traveling in both directions. But once US 52 was built in the area, OH 93 was realigned to go around the tunnel instead of through the tunnel, so the tunnel was closed to traffic in 1960. The legend of the haunted tunnel states that since there were so many accidents that took place inside the tunnel's narrow walls, the tunnel was cursed. The haunted legend states that there was an accident between a tanker truck and a school bus coming home after a high school football game on a cold, foggy Halloween night in 1

Porter-Parsonsfield Covered Bridge - Maine

  Spanning over the Ossipee River on the border between Porter in Oxford County, Maine and Parsonsfield in York County, Maine is the 152 foot long Porter-Parsonsfield Covered Bridge. The Porter-Parsonsfield Bridge is built in a Paddleford truss design, which is commonly found among covered bridges in the New England states. The covered bridge is the third bridge located at this site, with the first two bridges built in 1800 and 1808. However, there seems to be some dispute for when the covered bridge was built. There is a plaque on the bridge that states that the bridge may have been built in 1876, but in my research, I have found that this bridge may have been built in 1859 instead. That may check out since a number of covered bridges in northern New England were built or replaced around 1859 after a really icy winter. The year that the Porter-Parsonsfield Covered Bridge was built was not the only controversy surrounding its construction. There was a dispute over building and maintain

US Route 299 and modern California State Route 299

US Route 299 connected US Route 101 near Arcata of Humboldt County east across the northern mountain ranges of California to US Route 395 in Alturas of Modoc County.  US Route 299 was the longest child route of US Route 99 and is the only major east/west highway across the northern counties of California.  US Route 299 was conceptualized as the earliest iteration of what is known as the Winnemucca-to-the-Sea Highway.  The legacy of US Route 299 lives on today in the form of the 307 mile long California State Route 299.   Featured as the cover of this blog is the interchange of US Route 101 and US Route 299 north of Arcata which was completed as a segment of the Burns Freeway during 1956.   Part 1; the history of US Route 299 and California State Route 299 The development of the State Highways which comprised US Route 299 ("US 299") and later California State Route 299 ("CA 299") began with 1903 Legislative Chapter 366 which defined the general corridor of the Trinit