Skip to main content

Virginia's Natural Bridge State Park


 
Steeped in geologic and human history, the Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia could be considered one of the oldest bridges in the world. Since the settling of North America, Natural Bridge has served as one of the most recognizable icons of the wonders of nature in the United States. It has been revered by the likes of Thomas Jefferson, who purchased land in the area. It was the subject of several paintings by artists and is now the site of Natural Bridge State Park, allowing visitors from all over to witness the power and beauty of nature.

The 215 foot tall Natural Bridge itself is a remnant of a cave roof that collapsed. Geologists map the bedrock of Natural Bridge as part of the Beekmantown Formation, roughly 450 years old. It forms a remnant arch, however, the formation of the arch that forms Natural Bridge is much more recent. The arch may have developed only in the last 500,000 to 1,000,000 years. As rainwater seeped underground, it absorbed carbon dioxide and became slightly acidic, causing the underlying limestone to dissolve through cracks in the bedrock. As more water moved underground to create channels connecting the pores, enough rock was removed for a cave to form underground. Sinkholes may have formed above the channel, and over time, formed what is now Natural Bridge. Today, Natural Bridge is stable, but it is still collapsing over the course of geologic time. Eventually, the remaining portion of the ancient cave roof will collapse into Cedar Creek below.

The first European to document seeing Natural Bridge was John Peter Stallings, who was a captive of Native Americans in the Piedmont for six years and may have seen it while in their custody. Stallings settled in the upper James River valley in 1736 and wrote about Natural Bridge in his journal in 1742. Legend has it that George Washington surveyed Natural Bridge and carved his name in the rock about 23 feet above ground level, but there is no evidence proving that. However, Thomas Jefferson once owned the land where Natural Bridge is located. Jefferson probably saw the Natural Bridge for the first time on August 23, 1767. He obtained a land warrant in 1773, had it surveyed by James Tremble, then purchased it and 157 acres around it in 1774 for the equivalent of less than $200 in modern money between obtaining the land warrant, getting the property surveyed, and filing the necessary papers with the Secretary of the Virginia Colony in Williamsburg. Jefferson considered Natural Bridge to be a public trust and would not allow it to be injured, defaced, or masked from public view. Indeed, Natural Bridge and Niagara Falls in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries occupied the top tier as the most impressive natural wonders in the New World, with many arriving on horseback or carriages. Jefferson later tried to sell the Natural Bridge property for development as a tourist resort. However, the property stayed in his family until 1833, some years after his death.

Even after Thomas Jefferson's passing, Natural Bridge remained in the public consciousness. Famed Hudson River School artist Frederic Edwin Church painted The Natural Bridge in 1852. In what may have been the biggest hoax of 1873, it was reported by newspapers across the country that the Natural Bridge had caught fire and burned. At this time, the Natural Bridge was privately owned as a tourist attraction. Even during the era when Jefferson owned Natural Bridge, he had a two room log cabin built nearby, with one room reserved for guests to use as a retreat. Many famous guests stayed here, including John Marshall, James Monroe, Henry Clay, Sam Houston, and Martin Van Buren. In 1833, a new owner erected the Forest Inn to accommodate the increasing number of visitors. Natural Bridge had considerable notoriety during the 19th century, with Herman Melville comparing the size of the Bridge to the white whale in the famous novel "Moby Dick". William Cullen Bryant, another American literary figure, was quoted as saying Natural Bridge and Niagara Falls were the two most remarkable features of North America. A more modern hotel was built around 1890, first known as the Appledore and later renamed the Natural Bridge Hotel, with the reconstruction of a newer hotel in 1964 following a fire in 1963.

There were numerous proposals since at least the 1940's for the Commonwealth of Virginia or the United States federal government to purchase Natural Bridge and to preserve it in a park, ensuring public access through public ownership. In 2013, a real estate deal was structured so that Natural Bridge would be sold to a new owner, but would then be transferred into public ownership to become part of the Virginia State Park system. Natural Bridge State Park was established in 2016, but technically the land remained private. Before the transfer to public ownership, the debt for the purchase of the property had to be paid. Today, you can visit exhibits in the main building, take a walk down to the bottom of Natural Bridge, and even explore beyond the Natural Bridge itself. There are seven miles of hiking trails within Natural Bridge State Park, which lead you to caves, a Monacan village exhibit, a 30 foot waterfall along Cedar Creek called Lace Falls, and also to scenic vistas of the nearby Blue Ridge Mountains. There is a light show called "The Drama of Creation" that has been projected onto the bridge every night since 1920 and is the longest continuously running light show in the United States. While not part of the Natural Bridge State Park, there is also the Natural Bridge Caverns which is located nearby.

As much as Natural Bridge is a geologic wonder, it has also been used as a bridge for transportation for centuries. Native American trails crossed Cedar Creek over Natural Bridge for thousands of years, and there has been a road in place since 1753. US 11 was constructed across it during the 1930s, and in 2017 the Virginia Department of Transportation estimated that 2,000 vehicles a day traveled on top of the Natural Bridge. You may not notice that you're crossing over Natural Bridge while driving along US 11, since there are fences on both sides of the road. The arch of Natural Bridge is so large that engineers have assumed it could handle the weight of vehicles and whatever shaking that might be simulated. The Virginia Department of Transportation does not consider it to be a bridge that requires regular inspections for safety. Nevertheless, alternative routings for US 11 to bypass the Natural Bridge has been studied as the route serves as a bypass and alternate to nearby I-81 when traffic concerns demand it.

In 2017, the Virginia Department of Transportation agreed to use ground penetrating radar to identify if there were any voids in that portion of Natural Bridge underneath US 11. The chief engineer recommended finding a way to close Natural Bridge to traffic, but based that proposal on the designation of Natural Bridge as a Virginia state park rather than on data indicating safety issues. The initial conclusion was Natural Bridge itself is not a danger to the motoring public and it is not likely the bridge is going to collapse. However, concerns remained that vibrations from traffic could cause future rockfalls. In 2019, the Virginia Department of Transportation and Virginia State Parks agreed that the best strategy would be to relocate US 11 with two preferred alternatives being identified, so traffic would no longer have to cross the natural geological feature. The alternatives indicate a mix of using existing roads and new road construction, and even incorporating a portion of nearby VA 130 with one of the alternative routings around Natural Bridge.

In all, I enjoyed my visit to Natural Bridge State Park, from driving across it on US 11 and later trying to identify the accompanying fencing as I was viewing the Natural Bridge itself. I was awed by the scenic beauty of the natural bridge as I snapped photos throughout my visit. I spent about an hour at Natural Bridge, skipping the exhibits in the visitor's center, but gladly paying my $9 admission fee (in 2022) to see the Natural Bridge and continuing onto Lace Falls before turning around.

The visitor's center of Natural Bridge State Park with the Blue Ridge Mountains in the background.

The remnants of a 1,500 year old arbor vitae tree that died in 1980.

Historical plaque describing the history of Natural Bridge.

My first views of the Natural Bridge. It is even more impressive in person.

Sure, why not take a look at the seamy underbelly of the arch that makes up Natural Bridge.

Visiting Natural Bridge is even popular during the off-season.

Name carvings from visitors of yesteryear.

The arch is impressive and large.

There is plenty of seating to be found for assemblies, talks and light shows. I can even spy the fencing for US 11 on the top of Natural Bridge.

The Monacan Indian Living History Exhibit at Natural Bridge can be found by walking along Cedar Creek beyond the Natural Bridge. It was closed when I visited, but I could at least see it from the outside.

Cedar Creek

Lace Falls can be found at the end of the trail along Cedar Creek. It is a multi-tiered waterfall and I have read reports that it is either 30 feet tall or 50 feet tall.

Starting to work my way back along the trail aside Cedar Creek. Along the way, you can see a window into the Lost River, which is an underground stream.

Bridge across Cedar Creek to the Saltpeter Cave, which was leased by Thomas Jefferson for the excavation of potassium nitrate.

The entranceway to start or finish your hike down to Natural Bridge.

The Natural Bridge Hotel, located across US 11 from the Natural Bridge Visitor's Center.

The Natural Bridge has a bit of connection to Civil War history, as troops passed through the Natural Bridge area during the war.

One of the many "LOVE" art installments you'll find throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia is located at the parking lot of the Natural Bridge Visitor's Center.

In the rear of the visitor's center, you will find the post office for Natural Bridge, Virginia.


Historical plaque along US 11 describing Natural Bridge.


How to Get There:



Sources and Links:
Virginia State Parks - Natural Bridge State Park
Virginia Places - Natural Bridge
Atlas Obscura - The Natural Bridge
Thomas Jefferson's Monticello - Natural Bridge
Lexington Virginia - Virginia’s Natural Bridge – An Awe-Inspiring Wonder
Virginia Department of Transportation - Rockbridge County - Route 11 Natural Bridge State Park
Virginia Department of Transportation - Route 11 Alignment Study at Natural Bridge (PDF)
Natural Bridge Historic Hotel & Conference Center - Visit the History Museum at Natural Bridge

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

North Carolina Continues to Move Forward with Rail

2023 and the first half of 2024 have seen continued growth in North Carolina's passenger rail system.  From increased daily trains from Raleigh to Charlotte, federal funds for studying additional corridors, and receiving a historic grant to begin the construction of high-speed rail between Raleigh and Richmond, the last 18 months have been a flurry of activity at NCDOT's Rail Division.  And that's just the tip of the iceberg. As ridership and routes increase - the engine of North Carolina passenger rail trains will become a more common sight. (Adam Prince) Increased Passenger Train Service: On July 10, 2023, a fourth Piedmont round-trip rail service between Raleigh and Charlotte commenced.  The four Piedmont trains plus the daily Carolinian (to Washington, DC, and New York) bring the total of trains serving the two cities daily to five. The current daily Piedmont and Carolinian schedule between Charlotte and Raleigh (NCDOT) The result was over 641,000 passengers utilized pa

The Midway Palm and Pine of US Route 99

Along modern day California State Route 99 south of Avenue 11 just outside the City limits of Madera one can find the Midway Palm and Pine in the center median of the freeway.  The Midway Palm and Pine denotes the halfway point between the Mexican Border and Oregon State Line on what was US Route 99.  The Midway Palm is intended to represent Southern California whereas the Midway Pine is intended to represent Northern California.  Pictured above the Midway Palm and Pine can be seen from the northbound lanes of the California State Route 99 Freeway.   This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page The history of the Midway Palm and Pine The true timeframe for when the Midway Palm and Pine (originally a Deadora Cedar Tree) were planted is unknown.  In fact, the origin of the Midway Palm and Pine w

US Route 101 in Benbow, Garberville and Redway

The communities of Benbow, Garberville and Redway can all be found along US Route 101 within southern Humboldt County.  The former surface alignment of US Route 101 in Garberville and Redway once crossed the Garberville Bluffs along what is now Redwood Drive via a corridor constructed as part of the Redwood Highway during the 1910s.  US Route 101 through Benbow, Garberville and Redway was modernized by 1935.  US Route 101 would eventually be upgraded to freeway standards in Benbow, Garberville and Redway by extension of the Redwood Freeway during 1966-68.  As the cover photo the original grade of US Route 101 and the Redwood Highway can be seen at the Garberville Bluffs during 1934.  US Route 101 can be seen in the communities of Benbow, Garberville and Redway on the 1935 Division of Highways Map of Humboldt County .   The history of US Route 101 in Benbow, Garberville and Redway Benbow, Garberville and Redway lie on the banks of the South Fork Eel River of southern Humboldt County.  D